Rhipicephalus

(redirected from Rhipicephalus pulchellus)

Rhipicephalus

(rī'pi-sef'ă-lŭs),
A genus of inornate hard ticks (family Ixodidae) consisting of about 50 species, all of which are Old World except Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Eyes and festoons are present in both sexes; short palpi and ventral plates are present only in the male. The genus includes important vectors of disease in humans and domestic animals.
[G. rhipis, fan, + kephalē, head]

Rhipicephalus

/Rhi·pi·ceph·a·lus/ (ri″pĭ-sef´ah-lus) a genus of cattle ticks, many species of which transmit disease-producing organisms, such as Babesia ovis, B. canis, Rickettsia rickettsii, and R. conorii.

Rhipicephalus

(rī″pĭ-sĕf′ă-lŭs) [Gr. rhipis, fan, + kephale, head]
A genus of ticks belonging to the family Ixodidae. Several species, esp. R. sanguineus, are vectors for the organisms of spotted fever, boutonneuse fever, and other rickettsial diseases.

Rhipicephalus

a genus of ticks in the family Ixodidae.

Rhipicephalus appendiculatus
a three-host tick found on most animal species. Called also brown ear tick. Transmits Theileria parva, Babesia spp. and other protozoan and viral diseases including Nairobi sheep disease and louping ill. It is the principal vector of East Coast fever.
Rhipicephalus ayrei
transmits Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus bursa
transmits Babesia, Theileria, Anaplasma, Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Coxiella spp.
Rhipicephalus capensis
a three-host tick, parasitic on cattle; transmits East Coast fever.
Rhipicephalus evertsi
a two-host tick; transmits Theileria, Babesia, Borrelia, Rickettsia spp. Called also red-legged tick.
Rhipicephalus jeanelli
transmits Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus neavei
transmits Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus pulchellus
transmits Nairobi sheep disease virus and Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus sanguineus
a three-host tick, mainly a parasite of dogs but occurs on all species of mammals and birds. It transmits Babesia, Borrelia, Coxiella, Rickettsia, Anaplasma and Pasteurella spp. Also causes tick paralysis.
Rhipicephalus simus
a three-host tick that transmits Theileria parva.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Kenya, CCHFV has been detected on only 2 occasions: in Rhipicephalus pulchellus ticks collected in the 1970s from a dying sheep in a veterinary laboratory in the town of Kabete outside Nairobi (2) and from a person with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in western Kenya in October 2000 (5).
Six isolates of the virus were obtained from pools of Amblyomma gemma and Rhipicephalus pulchellus ticks collected from hides of cattle in Nairobi, Kenya, in October 1999.
gemma and Rhipicephalus pulchellus ticks collected on 4 days during the fall of 1999 were identified as similar to DUGV on the basis of nucleotide sequence of a fragment of the S segment genomic RNA.
Species of ticks collected included Rhipicephalus pulchellus (56%), Amblyomma gemma (14%), R.