Rh antigen


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Rh antigen

Transfusion medicine Any of a composite of multiple blood group antigens on RBC membranes–eg, Rh-C–c, C, CG, Cw, Rh-D–D, weak D–formerly Du, Dw, Rh-E–e, E, Ew, Rh-G, Rh-LW, Rh-Nea and Rhnull. See Rh system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harvey Klein and David Anstee had opined that the Rh antigens were present only on red cells; hence, D immunisation evolved in D negative subjects either after injection of D positive red cells or following transplacental haemorrhage from a D positive foetus.
RH genotyping has thus been used to identify altered RH alleles and to predict whether Rh antibodies are autoantibodies or alloantibodies, and it is beginning to have an important role in improving transfusion therapy in patients with SCD by expanding the ability to provide true Rh antigen-matched RBCs for those patients with RH variant haplotypes who lack a conventional Rh antigen.
13] observed a significant association between the incidence of TB and a positive Rh antigen in blood group A.
1) The frequency of the five major Rh antigens in various ethnic groups is listed below: (2)
However, there is no systematic study to understand variants of Rh antigen in different parts of the country in different ethnic populations.
Rh antigen emerged as second most important blood group system due to hemolytic disease of newborn and its importance in Rh (D) negative individuals in subsequent transfusions once they develop Rh antibodies6.
Demonstration of seven epitopes of the Rh antigen D using human monoclonal anti-D antibodies and red cells from D categories.
With the discovery of the Rh antigen and its relationship to hemolytic disease of the newborn in 1939 and 1940, it soon became a recognized standard of care to make every attempt to avoid transfusing Rh(D)-positive red blood cells to Rh(D)-negative individuals.
The most commonly recognized of these are the ABO blood groups, and Rh antigens (which are signified by the "positive" or "negative" that comes after A, B or O on your blood type).
Typing of blood ABO and Rh antigens for the purpose of transfusions, and typing of histocompatibility antigens prior to organ transplantation, are two common examples of treatment based upon an individual's genetics.
The Rh antigens are expressed as part of an ankyrin complex in the red blood cell (RBC) membrane as a heterotrimer consisting of one molecule of Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG) and two molecules of Rh proteins.