revaccination

(redirected from Revaccinate)
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re·vac·ci·na·tion

(rē'vak-si-nā'shŭn),
Vaccination of an individual previously successfully vaccinated.

revaccination

[rēvak′sinā′shən]
an immunization that is repeated, although the original was successful.

revaccination

(rē″văk-sĭ-nā′shŭn)
An inoculation against a disease to sustain a passive immune response (protective antibodies) against a potentially infectious organism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We agreed we should revaccinate with a different product, and then run another titer test.
Farmers who took the decision to vaccinate last year will also need to revaccinate in 2009," said Dr Glossop.
A potentially safer alternative for protecting infants, he says, is to revaccinate family members and other people likely to have contact with the babies.
The study opens the door to consider whether the most effective strategy would be to revaccinate adolescents in order to restore their immunity to these viruses," not the development of a new vaccine against new strains of the mumps virus, the FDA statement said.
The most conservative approach is to revaccinate if a patient received vaccine that had been stored at improper temperatures, he said.
Revaccinate once after 5 years or more have elapsed since initial
The positive antibody test result is fairly straightforward; it shows you don't have to revaccinate for these viruses.
The AAHA guidelines separate vaccines into different categories--core, noncore, and not recommended at all--and suggest that veterinarians revaccinate for core diseases such as parvovirus and distemper no more than every three years.
Until we have further information to the contrary, I'm going to continue to revaccinate high-risk patients.
There are just times when it doesn't make sense to revaccinate everyone.
For questionable oral polio vaccination, either reimmunize with inactive polio vaccine (IPV) or do serologic testing; if levels are low, revaccinate with IPV In a child who has reportedly received three IPV doses, either reimmunize on the grounds that the child may not have actually received the shots, or test for type-specific antibody and reimmunize if this is low.
Herold et al[2] clearly demonstrate the negative impact that poor prior documentation has when immunization strategies change, resulting in unnecessary use of health care dollars to revaccinate individuals who do not have proper documentation.