retention

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retention

 [re-ten´shun]
1. the process of holding back or keeping in a position.
2. persistence in the body of material normally excreted, such as from the bowel or bladder.
3. the number of staff members in a facility that remain in employment.
urinary retention a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has incomplete emptying of the bladder.
retention of urine accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn),
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially food and drink in the stomach.
See also: memory.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, as urine or feces.
See also: memory.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory.
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. In dentistry, a passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

/re·ten·tion/ (re-ten´shun) the process of holding back or keeping in position, as persistence in the body of material normally excreted, or maintenance of a dental prosthesis in proper position in the mouth.

retention

(rĭ-tĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act of retaining or the condition of being retained: the retention of nutrients in the soil; the retention of jobs in the city.
2. The practice of requiring a student to repeat a class or a year of school because of insufficient educational progress to advance.
3. The ability to recall or recognize what has been learned or experienced; memory.
4. The inability of a person or animal to eliminate a bodily waste.

retention

[riten′shən]
1 a resistance to movement or displacement.
2 the ability of the digestive system to hold food and fluid.
3 the inability to urinate or defecate.
4 the ability of the mind to remember information acquired from reading, observation, or other processes.
5 the inherent property of a dental restoration to maintain its position without displacement under axial stress.
6 a characteristic of proper tooth cavity preparation in which provision is made for preventing vertical displacement of the cavity filling.
7 a period of treatment during which an individual wears an appliance to maintain teeth in positions to which they have been moved by orthodontic procedures. retain, v.

retention

Neurology See Memory UrologySee Urinary retention.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially the retaining of food and drink in the stomach.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, such as urine or feces.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. dentistry A passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
2. Resistance to dislodgement.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention (rēten´shən),

n 1. power to retain; capacity for retaining; the inherent property of a restoration to maintain its position without displacement under stress; results from close adaptation of the restoration to the prepared form of the tooth, usually aided by cement.
n 2. term relating to the provision in cavity preparation for preventing displacement of a restoration. Retention supplements resistance form and is specifically created to resist any lateral or tipping force that may be brought against the restoration during and after its insertion.
n 3. resistance of a denture to removal in a direction opposite that of its insertion; the quality inherent in the denture that resists the force of gravity, adhesiveness of foods, and forces associated with the opening of the jaws.
n 4. the period of treatment during which the individual wears an appliance to maintain the teeth in the desired position.
retention arm,
retention, circumferential,
n frictional resistance to displacement derived from completely veneering the exposed tooth surface.
retention, denture,
n 1. the means by which dentures are held in position in the oral cavity; the maintenance of a denture in its position in the oral cavity; the resistance to the movement of a denture from its basal seat in a direction opposite to that in which it was inserted.
n 2. the resistance of a denture to vertical movement in the occlusal direction from its basal seat.
retention, direct,
n retention obtained in a removable partial denture by the use of attachments or clasps that resist removal from abutment teeth.
retention form,
retention, indirect,
n retention obtained in a removable partial denture through the use of indirect retainers.
retention, partial denture,
n the fixation of a fixed partial denture by means of crowns, inlays, or other retainers.
retention, pin,
retention, pinhole,
n one or more small holes, 2 to 3 mm in depth, placed in suitable areas of a cavity preparation parallel with the general line of draft to provide or supplement resistance and retention form.
retention, radicular,
n retention derived from projections of metal into the root canals of pulpless teeth.
retention, removable partial denture,
n the resistance to movement of a removable partial denture from its supporting structures, gained by the use of direct and indirect retainers or other attachments.

retention

the process of holding back or keeping in a position, such as persistence in the body of material normally excreted. See also retained.

renal retention cysts
these are acquired and result from scarring and obstruction of tubules in chronic renal disease.
urine retention
accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brine Ranson noted the example of a fine paper mill that was successfully using a micropolymer/APAM retention and drainage program.
Consistent retention and drainage under harsher conditions--higher sheet ash (increased from 15 to 19%), faster machine speeds, and high levels of anionic trash (in OBA high bright grades).
Irenee Philippe noted that combinations of micropolymer and microparticle systems provide the latest technology for papermakers to decouple the mechanisms of retention and drainage (RDF), allowing for unprecedented control of the papermaking process.
The media also largely ignored other CCSR studies that had indicated that Chicago's retention policy was popular among the city's teachers, principals, and parents for, among other things, setting clear standards for student performance (see "Educators and Students Speak," page 49).
In New York, the critical CCSR studies helped fuel opposition to the new retention program.
The Chicago Board of Education, also responding to the new CCSR reports, immediately modified its student retention program by dropping math scores as a consideration in retention decisions.
In many respects, risk retention resembles equities options, such as puts or calls.
This is one reason why risk retention more closely resembles an investment decision.
These broke treatment concepts grew out of existing retention aid polymers and continue to be used effectively today.
Some examples of this coagulant concept being used in different parts of the industry include internal size promotion or fixation, efficiency gains for wet end starch and dry strength additives, optical whitener quenching, incoming water color removal, effluent neutralization prior to the clarifier, dual polymer retention systems, and drainage aids for save alls and forming fabrics.
Doing so on the fly takes an enormous amount of agility in terms of algorithms, data hygiene, and processing power," said Andrew Waage, CTO and Co-Founder at Retention Science.
Retention Science adjusted their platform so we could do both C while still optimizing our other campaigns for overall margin," said Justin Winter, Diamond Candles CEO and Co-Founder.