Resurrectionists


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Resurrectionists

A tongue-in-cheek term used in 19th Britain for a person who provided corpses for postmortem examinations by medical students and doctors by robbing graves (”resurrecting the dead”).
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While the Resurrectionists represent the patriarchal and hetero normative majority, ANZ is an underground organisation that tries to challenge their pervasive power.
Set in London in 1826, this atmospheric thriller sees an apprentice anatomist drawn into the dark power of the city's resurrectionists and their trade in stealing bodies from the grave.
Rather, in Blake's anti-elegy, the decaying corpse of Urizen is treated with the cold indifference and absence of spiritual import that would be appropriate to the scientist's point of view: Urizen's is "a noisom body"--ready for dissection--consigned "To the jaws of devouring darkness" facilitated by muddy resurrectionists and too curious morbid anatomists (Plate 28:2--3).
Kline's conflict with the resurrectionists can be understood in abstract terms as a clash between religious practices--is the word or the deed stronger?
The annual award winners are "The Resurrectionists," a novel by Michael Collins; "The Necessary Grace to Fall," short stories by Gina Ochsner; "Lullaby," a novel by Chuck Palahniuk; "Early Morning: Remembering My Father, William Stafford" by Kim Stafford; "Dumb Luck," poetry by Sam Hamill; and "A Perfect Snow," a children's book by Nora Martin.
On Thursday the same venue plays host to 80s resurrectionists Rubix Kube.
28 WED HIDDEN ABERDEEN TOUR Learn of the murky medical doings of the surgeons, students and resurrectionists in the city from the 1800s in Hidden Aberdeen: Burkers & Body-Snatchers.
For the bereaved family, understandably reluctant to see their loved one become the subject of a lecture series, there were two easy ways to ward off the resurrectionists.
However, he finds himself drawn to his master's nemesis, Lucan, the most powerful of the city's resurrectionists.
They had been dug-up by the resurrectionists or the "sack 'em up men", as they were called in Liverpool, for one-eyed Dr John Knox, who attracted big crowds to his lectures at the Medical School in Edinburgh.
Sim, who possessed a remarkable fund of stories about suicides, ghosts, resurrectionists and other macabre characters.