restriction enzyme

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Related to Restriction enzymes: Restriction fragments

re·stric·tion en·do·nu·cle·ase

one of many endonucleases isolated from bacteria that cleave or hydrolyze (cut) foreign double-stranded DNA chains at specific recognition sites defined by DNA sequences; these endonucleases have become standard laboratory devices for making specific cuts in DNA as a first step in deducing sequences and are sometimes referred to as a "chemical knife," usually named by a three- or four-letter abbreviation of the name of the organism from which isolated (for example, EcoB from Escherichia coli, strain B).
Synonym(s): restriction enzyme

restriction enzyme

n.
Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of DNA at specific sites to produce discrete fragments, used especially in genetic engineering. Also called restriction endonuclease.

re·stric·tion en·do·nu·cle·ase

(rĕ-strik'shŭn en'dō-nū'klē-ās)
One of many endonucleases isolated from bacteria that hydrolyze (cut) double-stranded DNA chains at specific sequences, thus inactivating a foreign (viral or other) DNA and restricting its activity; standard laboratory devices for making specific cuts in DNA as a first step in deducing sequences.
Synonym(s): restriction enzyme.

restriction enzyme

One of the many enzymes that break DNA at specific sites. These enzymes are extensively used in research and in GENETIC ENGINEERING. Also known as restriction endonucleases.

restriction enzyme

or

restriction endonuclease

an endonuclease that recognizes a specific DNA base sequence (recognition sequence, recognition site, restriction sequence or restriction site) and cleaves both strands of DNA at or near that site. The enzyme cuts the DNA, generating restriction fragments with OVERHANGING ENDS or BLUNT ENDS. See also COHESIVE ENDS.
References in periodicals archive ?
KC200562 and KC200563) and generated using restriction enzymes during this study, ([dagger]) Predicted fragments of S.
After ligation, appropriate restriction enzymes cut this circular molecule.
To illustrate how the use of restriction enzymes results in the production of unique DNA fingerprint patterns for different individuals, the following demonstration was used (Figure 4; this figure was recreated as individual poster board pieces): two DNA molecules of equal length but with a different sequence of nucleotide bases were presented to students.
Restriction enzyme digestion of the isolated plasmid was carried out by incubating the reaction mixture in a water bath at 37[degrees]C for 3 hours and deactivated in 65[degrees]C for 20 minutes.
falciparum ama-1 and esp genes on the basis of molecular weight of PCR product and RFLP patterns with Dra-1 and Ssp-1 restriction enzymes respectively ama-1 (n = 67) Allelic types Mol.
2005) and the use of even three restriction enzymes may not be adequate for identification to the species level (Matsumoto et al.
We evaluated a site-specific methylation analytical approach that combines simple digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes and subsequent quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of previously characterized ICRs (15-18).
33) Each recipient was responsible for a distinct aspect of the discovery and implication of these 'molecular scissors': Arber for hypothesising the existence of the restriction-modification system, (34) Smith for testing and verifying Arber's hypothesis, (30,31) and Nathans for pioneering the application of restriction enzymes to genetics.
Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis run conditions for 6 restriction enzymes used to subtype Salmonella Enteritidis * Digestion Enzyme temperature, units, Run time, h Enzyme [degrees]C per plug ([dagger]) Xbal 37 50 19 BIM 37 30 19 Spel 37 30 20.
Accounting for the vast majority of restriction enzymes used in labs, Type II enzymes cut the DNA at specific positions with precision and repeatability.

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