restraint

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restraint

 [re-strānt´]
the forcible confinement or control of a subject, as of a confused, disoriented, psychotic, or irrational person; it may be either physical or chemical. Restraint of any kind is used only when the patient's behavior presents a danger to himself or herself or another person. It is never used for the convenience of staff or as a substitute for conscientious nursing care.



Chemical restraint refers to the quieting of a violently psychotic or irrational person by means of medication. Physical restraints include restraining mitts to prevent removal of drainage tubes, restraints of upper and lower limbs to limit mobility and prevent the patient from climbing out of bed or physically harming someone at the bedside, and waist and body restraints such as a camisole (straitjacket). Even though the patient might not fully understand the need for restraint, a brief explanation of why it is being done should be given.

Assessment of the need for physical restraint includes a systematic determination of the level of confusion or disorientation exhibited by the patient and objective observations of his behavior. If possible, the cause of the patient's behavior should be identified, e.g., trauma, drug or alcohol intoxication, electrolyte imbalance, elevated temperature, pain, fear, or mental exhaustion. Findings of the assessment should be well documented in specific terms for legal reasons as well as to inform other caretakers and provide continuity of care.

Alternatives to physical restraint include reality orientation for disoriented patients (clocks, radio, television, newspapers, and magazines will all aid patients to orient themselves to reality); controlling the environment to minimize confusion and stimulation (restraints can intensify anxiety and confusion); and constant attendance at the bedside.

Since restraint of patients subjects them to the hazards of immobility, it is essential that they be monitored closely, their vital signs checked regularly, and their position changed at least every two hours. The use of restraints is an active area of nursing research. The most appropriate and least restrictive type of restraint should always be the one chosen.
Types of restraints: A, Chest restraint; B, Hand mitt restraint; C, Belt restraint; D, Mummy restraint. From Lammon et al., 1996.
jacket restraint camisole.
physical restraint
1. see restraint.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application, monitoring, and removal of mechanical restraining devices or manual restraints which are used to limit the physical mobility of a patient.

re·straint

(rē-strānt'),
In hospital psychiatry, intervention to prevent an excited or violent patient from harming himself, herself, or others; may involve the use of a camisole (straitjacket).
[O. Fr. restrainte]

restraint

/re·straint/ (re-strānt´) the forcible confinement or control of a subject.

restraint

(rĭ-strānt′)
n.
1. A device or other means of limiting movement, used to prevent the infliction of harm to self or others.
2. The act of restraining.
3. Control or repression of feelings; constraint.

restraint

[ristrānt′]
Etymology: L, restringere, to confine
any one of numerous mechanical devices or chemical agents used to hinder or restrict a patient's movement. Examples of mechanical restraints are specially designed slings, jackets, or diapers. Restraints that are too tight may cause skin irritation; those that fit too loosely do not serve their purpose. When a restraining device needs to be used, it should be correctly sized for the patient and allow enough space for two fingers to fit between the patient's skin and the restraint. Restraints are usually removed every 4 hours or more frequently to assess skin integrity and provide skin care. Release of restraints at least every 2 hours is recommended to allow range-of-motion exercises and assistance with activities of daily living. Throughout the period of restraint, it is important to continue recording all physical and psychosocial assessments in accordance with hospital protocol. The least restrictive restraint that promotes patient safety or positioning is required. See also mechanical restraint.
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Jacket restraint tied to wheelchair

restraint

A term for mild bondage used in sexual fantasy enactments.

restraint

Control or prevention of an action Nursing Any device used to restrict the free movement of Pts with behavioral or physical problems, who may cause harm to themselves and others. See Mechanical restraint, Pharmacologic restraint.

re·straint

(rĕ-strānt')
psychiatry Intervention to prevent an excited or violent patient from doing harm to her- or himself or others; may involve the use of a camisole (straightjacket).
[O. Fr. restrainte]

restraint,

n any one of a number of devices used in aiding the immobilization of patients, especially children in traction.

restraint

control of an animal so that it can be examined or treated.

restraint bag
see feline restraint bag.
restraint cage
see squeeze cage.
chemical restraint
tranquilizers, sedatives and anesthetics are used depending on the wildness of the animal. See also blow dart.
diversionary restraint
use of various techniques to distract the animal and permit minimal physical restraint, usually used on horses. Examples are tapping or rubbing the head, using a blindfold, pressure on a skin fold, holding an ear, applying a chain shank over the bridge of the nose and use of a war bridle.
physical restraint
includes everything from halters to casting harness for horses, from hog-holders to dog-catchers.
References in classic literature ?
Pelet's bachelor's life had been passed in proper French style with due disregard to moral restraint, and I thought his married life promised to be very French also.
There is not, among the most religious and instructed men of the most religious and civil nations, a reliance on the moral sentiment and a sufficient belief in the unity of things, to persuade them that society can be maintained without artificial restraints, as well as the solar system; or that the private citizen might be reasonable and a good neighbor, without the hint of a jail or a confiscation.
Again she called him by name, and at the same instant the ape, fretting under the restraints of the unaccustomed garments of the Tarmangani, tore the burnoose from him, revealing to the eyes of the horror-struck woman the hideous face and hairy form of a giant anthropoid.
And after such classification he avoided the things that hurt, the restrictions and restraints, in order to enjoy the satisfactions and the remunerations of life.
I felt that I need be under no restraints of honor with a man who was keeping me a prisoner, and who had made an accomplice of me by threatening my life.
Incapable of answering him; forgetful of the ordinary restraints of social intercourse--with the one doubt that preserved her belief in Mirabel, eager for confirmation--Emily signed to this stranger to follow her into a corner of the room, out of hearing.
Ferrari's indignation burst its way through all restraints.
The bride and bridegroom evaded the restraints of lawful authority, and presumed to meet together privately, before they were married, in the conservatory at Ham Farm.
When he had thoroughly recovered himself, and had joined me on the beach, his warm Southern nature broke through all artificial English restraints in a moment.
In every frontier settlement there are men who have come there to escape restraint.
But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.
They bowed to each other with a formal politeness, which betrayed on either side an uneasy sense of restraint.