mining

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mining

(mi'ning) [ME]
1. The extraction of useful information from a database. Synonym: data mining
2. The extraction from the earth of materials with industrial value, such as coal, silver, or gold. Miners are exposed to various occupational disorders, including respiratory diseases (e.g., pneumoconiosis), allergies, and traumatic injuries.

data mining

Mining (1).
References in periodicals archive ?
In "Committing Canadian Sociology," Ralph Matthews (2014) outlines a refreshingly positive vision for Canadian Sociology in which the Canadian experience features prominently and serves to inform our analyses of resource extraction in the context of broader social processes a, la Staples Theory.
Foreign companies manage nearly all resource extraction in Africa, because they alone have the necessary technical skills to carry out such an activity.
In the old MDP, resource extraction in that area was covered by a "number of very broad statements," said Tim Ford, the city's senior planner for the west unit.
Allowing logging to take place there would signify a reversal of the contentious Clinton-era "roadless rule" banning road-building and resource extraction on 58 million untracked acres within the country's sprawling national forest system.
This is a testament to the hard work of Appalachian communities and anti-coal activists across the country, whose collective pressure left Bank of America with little choice but to abandon its support for this barbaric form of resource extraction," said Tarbotton.
Agriculture and natural resource extraction have generally been bright spots in the Arkansas economy.
Sparton Resources is also evaluating similar opportunities for by-product uranium resource extraction in other international locations, and holds a production royalty on the 10 million pound (historical resource) Blizzard uranium deposit in British Columbia.
As Canada's other natural resource extraction industries face renewed world demand, this indicates what other communities can expect.
The smaller resource extraction and construction markets are expected to see below average increases.
But both commissions agreed that the world's marine environments are critically endangered due to pollution, development, resource extraction and myriad other human-induced problems, and stressed that stronger governance and innovative technological and policy solutions are needed urgently to help avert a global crisis.
Resource extraction activities are banned or regulated in Antarctica, but bio-prospecting activities suffer no such limitation.

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