reservoir

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reservoir

 [rez´er-vwahr]
1. a storage place or cavity.
2. an alternate or passive host or carrier that harbors pathogenic organisms without injury to itself and serves as a source from which other individuals can be infected.
cardiotomy reservoir in cardiopulmonary bypass, a collection chamber for blood suctioned from the heart chambers and pericardium.
continent ileal reservoir an intra-abdominal pouch having a volume of at least 500 ml and a valve created from a portion of the ileum, pulled through the stoma, and lying flat against the abdominal wall; it maintains continence of feces and is emptied by a catheter when full. See also continent ileostomy and kock pouch.
ileoanal reservoir see ileoanal reservoir.
Ommaya reservoir a device implanted in the brain for instillation of medication or removal of fluid through a catheter in a lateral ventricle. When used for the direct administration of chemotherapy, it enhances the concentration of medication in brain tissue.

re·cep·tac·u·lum

, pl.

re·cep·tac·u·la

(rē'sep-tak'yū-lŭm, -lă),
A receptacle.
Synonym(s): reservoir
[L. fr. re-cipio, pp. -ceptus, to receive, fr. capio, to take]

reservoir

/re·ser·voir/ (rez´er-vwahr)
1. a storage place or cavity.
3. an alternate host or passive carrier of a pathogenic organism.

continent ileal reservoir 
1. a valved intra-abdominal pouch that maintains continence of the feces and is emptied by a catheter when full.
2. a neobladder made from a section of ileum.
continent urinary reservoir  neobladder.
ileoanal reservoir  a pouch for the retention of feces, formed by suturing together multiple limbs of ileum and connected to the anus by an ileal conduit; used with colectomy to maintain continence in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.
Pecquet's reservoir  cisterna chyli.

reservoir

(rĕz′ər-vwär′, -vwôr′, -vôr′)
n.
1. A natural or artificial pond or lake used for the storage and regulation of water.
2. A receptacle or chamber for storing a fluid.
3. Anatomy See cisterna.
4. Medicine An organism or population that directly or indirectly transmits a pathogen while being virtually immune to its effects.

reservoir

[rez′ərvwär]
Etymology: Fr, réservoir
a chamber or receptacle for holding or storing a fluid.

re·cep·tac·u·lum

, pl. receptacula (rē-sĕp-tak'yū-lŭm, -lă)
A receptacle.
Synonym(s): reservoir.
[L. fr. re-cipio, pp. -ceptus, to receive, fr. capio, to take]

Reservoir

A population in which a virus is maintained without causing serious illness to the infected individuals.
Mentioned in: Hemorrhagic Fevers

reservoir

1. a storage place or cavity.
2. an alternative host or passive carrier of a pathogenic organism.

reservoir control
control of infection in animal, bird or insect populations which act as reservoirs for infection of domesticated animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Area-capacity Curves And Evaluate Sedimentation For Its Three (3) On-stream Reservoirs; Griggs Reservoir, O
The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) broke ground on a new water supply reservoir near Lane City, TX, in December last year.
For further information on fishing at the reservoirs, visit the DCR website at www.
PLANS to drain a Huddersfield reservoir are back on the agenda.
The truth is the reservoirs are a key resource for the community, providing an opportunity for outdoor recreation.
EWEB adds a greater amount of chlorine to the reservoir water than is typically used in reservoirs, Locke said.
This approach expanded the naive view that reservoirs are nonpathogenic, single-species populations and encompassed the complexity of pathogen-host communities observed in nature.
Improvements in both, extended reach and horizontal drilling, use of minimum facility platforms, introduction of sub-sea completions using FPSO technology, and stimulation of low permeability reservoirs have made production much more efficient.
There will be enough water from the city's other nearby reservoirs to serve the residents of Chevy Chase Canyon during construction, Kavounas said.
It provides quick disconnects and an easy and quick way to refill aircraft reservoirs with clean, moisture- and air-free hydraulic fluid.
Gryphon Exploration will utilize Object Reservoir's services over the next year on various reservoirs located in the Shelf area of the Gulf of Mexico.
In this way, he points out, dams and the reservoirs behind them have the same effect as wetlands, holding back sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus.