rescue

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rescue

Emergency medicine Any activity that brings a victim of disaster or accident to safety. Cf Disaster Oncology Rescue therapy. See Leucovorin rescue, Marker rescue.

RESCUE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Randomized Evaluation of Salvage Angioplasty with Combined Utilization of Endpoints that compared the effects of rescue coronary angioplasty with conservative therapy of occluded infarct-related arteries. See Coronary angioplasty, Rescue adjunctive coronary angioplasty.

res·cue

(res'kyū)
1. To save from harm, in a clinical or therapeutic sense.
2. Describing an analgesic prescribed for breakthrough pain (e.g., opioids for cancer therapy).
[M.E. rescouen]

rescue

(res′kū″)
1. To free a person from a hazardous situation such as entrapment in an automobile, trench, cave, or burning building, or from the site of a hazardous material spill.
2. To restore an organ to its normal function after an illness or a treatment that has damaged it.

abdominal rescue

Emergency cesarean delivery of a fetus jeopardized during labor or failed vaginal birth. Indications for surgical intervention include fetal distress associated with dystocia, arrested descent, abruptio placentae, or umbilical cord prolapse.

stem cell rescue

In patients being treated with high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the removal of stem cells (the precursors to red and white blood cells and platelets) from the patient's blood before treatment and their reinfusion after treatment. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and other growth factors are administered to stimulate proliferation of the stem cells after reinfusion. Until adequate numbers of cells repopulate the patient's marrow and bloodstream, the patient is at high risk for infection and bleeding.

Stem cell rescue is used in patients with solid tumors not involving bone marrow who require treatments that would destroy the blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells. The process is immunologically advantageous because the cells infused are the patient's own cells, and thus do not have foreign antigens.

References in classic literature ?
Not a single silent hand-shake did he bestow on his rescuer.
The speed and strength of her rescuer filled Jane Clayton with wonder.
She saw that her would-be rescuer was young and strong featured--all together a very fine specimen of manhood; and to her great wonderment it was soon apparent that he was no unequal match for the great mountain of muscle that he fought.
He did not answer at once and her heart rose in her breast as it filled with the hope that her brave rescuer might be the same Roger de Conde who had saved her from the hirelings of Peter of Colfax but a few short weeks since.
I did not realize, I could not realize for a long time afterward, that any woman could sink to such moral depravity as that one must have to call a would-be rescuer to death.
A man's hand reached over a canoe-side and dragged him in by the scruff of the neck, and, although he snarled and struggled to bite his rescuer, he was not so much enraged as was he torn by the wildest solicitude for Skipper.
After a while, still weak and faint, I turned around to see who was my rescuer.
We were playing Elaine" explained Anne frigidly, without even looking at her rescuer, "and I had to drift down to Camelot in the barge--I mean the flat.
Next, he fished out a ten-dollar gold-piece and offered it to his rescuer.
The idea of the son of the poet, the rescuer of the most forlorn damsel of modern times, the man of violence, gentleness and generosity, sitting up to his neck in ship's accounts amused me.
The rescuer did the only thing he could-- ran after him with the rope and tried to tie him hand and foot.
Weller, when he was thus enabled to behold his rescuer.