lagging strand

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lagging strand

In DNA replication, the single strand forming a duplex in the direction away from the fork in the parental DNA. Replication on the lagging strand is discontinuous and can occur briefly in both directions.

lagging strand

the strand in DNA replication that is synthesized discontinuously, to generate Okazaki fragments (named after R. Okazaki who first detected them). These are later sealed by DNA LIGASE. See DNA, SEMICONSERVATIVE REPLICATION MODEL.

strand

a term commonly used to describe one of the two complementary polynucleotide chains found in double-stranded DNA.

lagging strand
in DNA replication, the strand in which the nascent strand is synthesized in discontinuous segments after the other or leading strand. See also okazaki fragments.
leading strand
in DNA replication, the strand that is copied continuously.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is because DNA replication forks can encounter chemical adducts, DNA secondary structures, topological constraints or bound proteins that hinder their progression.
Among the topics are dormant replication origins, break-induced DNA replication, the mini-chromosome maintenance replicative helicase, the spatial and temporal organization of DNA replication in bacteria and eukarya, DNA replication timing, replication-fork dynamics, sister chromatid cohesion, translesion DNA polymerases, rescuing stalled or damaged replication forks, genome instability in cancer, regulating DNA replication in plants, endoreplication, the archaeology of eukaryotic DNA replication, human mitochondrial DNA replication, whether human papillomavirus infections are warts or cancer, and adenovirus DNA replication.
Objective: Our genetic material is continually subjected to damage, either from endogenous sources such as reactive oxygen species, produced as by-products of oxidative metabolism, from the breakdown of replication forks during cell growth, or by agents in the environment such as ionising radiation or carcinogenic chemicals.