recidivism

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recidivism

 [re-sid´ĭ-vizm]
a tendency to relapse into a previous condition, disease, or pattern of behavior, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

re·cid·i·vism

(rē-sid'i-vizm),
The tendency of a person toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism

/re·cid·i·vism/ (re-sid´ĭ-vizm) a tendency to relapse, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

recidivism (recid)

[risid′iviz′əm]
Etymology: L, recidivus, falling back
a tendency by an ill person to relapse or return to a hospital.

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity (rĕ-sidi-vizm, -si-divi-tē)
A tendency toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism (rəsid´əviz´əm),

n 1. the tendency for an ill person to relapse or return to the hospital.
n 2. the return to a life of crime after a conviction and sentence.
References in periodicals archive ?
It significantly reduces repeat offenses and thereby cuts the cost of operating prisons and jails in the long run.
Treatment for sex offenders works to curtail the rates of repeat offenses.
Mere possession or use of fireworks is a "violation" under New York's Penal Code, while the sale of fireworks can be class A or B misdemeanors; repeat offenses are class E felonies.
Using money from a three-year federal grant, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has a deputy specifically assigned to work with domestic violence victims to guard against repeat offenses.
Today's kids are sent to the lodge for more serious misdemeanor crimes or repeat offenses, and they rarely stay for more than one year - not the four or five years that was once the norm.
The Web site is designed to list all level II and level III offenders considered the most dangerous and likely to commit repeat offenses.
But he also said the stewards' leniency encourages repeat offenses.
tracNET24 is a major development in public safety as it works to reduce the number of offenders who go out and commit repeat offenses.
It requires a 15-years-to-life prison term for repeat offenses of felony driving under the influence - that is, causing bodily injury.
If we can get them access to treatment, we can prevent further crimes and stop the cycle of repeat offenses.