Renshaw cells

Ren·shaw cells

(ren'shaw),
inhibitory interneurons that are innervated by collaterals from motoneurons and in turn form synapses with the same and adjacent motoneurons to exert inhibition; identified physiologically and by intracellular injection technique.

Renshaw cells

[ren′shô]
Etymology: B. Renshaw, American neurologist, 1911-1948; L, cella, storeroom
small cells that reduce motor neuron discharge through a feedback circuit involving axon collaterals that excite interneurons. The system prevents rapid repeated firing of motor neurons.

Renshaw,

Birdsey, 20th century U.S. neurophysiologist.
Renshaw cells - inhibitory interneurons.

Renshaw cells

interneurons in the central nervous system that provide a regulatory feedback system to control the excitability of motor neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
They showed that vibration disinhibits the recurrent inhibition of Renshaw cells.
This means that the effect of slow MNs on Renshaw cells is weak, but Renshaw cells exert a strong inhibitory effect on these MNs (26).
By increasing intensity, more fast MNs are recruited, attenuating the inhibitory effects of Renshaw cells due to recruitment of more fast MNs (26).
In contrast to the low-intensity state, Renshaw cells cannot inhibit all the fast MNs, so alteration of ascending slope is more apparent in the five-point fit.
It is possible that vibration affects the cerebellum in addition to the sensory cortex and these effects inhibit Renshaw cells.
Lyshenko and his colleagues attributed vibration-induced inhibition of Renshaw cells to supraspinal centers (22).
I Contribution from slow to fast motor units to the excitation of Renshaw cells.