rennet

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chy·mo·sin

(kī'mō-sin),
An aspartic proteinase structurally homologous with pepsin, formed from prochymosin; the milk-curdling enzyme obtained from the glandular layer of the stomach of the calf. Acts on a single peptide bond (-Phe-Met-) in κ-casein.
Synonym(s): chymase, pexin, rennase, rennet, rennin

rennet

(rĕn′ĭt)
n.
1. An extract made from the inner lining of the fourth stomach of a calf or other young ruminant, used in cheesemaking to curdle milk.
2. A similar enzyme-containing substance obtained from certain other animals, plants, fungi, or bacteria.

rennet

(rĕn′ĕt) [ME.]
1. The lining of the fourth stomach of a calf.
2. A fluid containing rennin (chymosin), a coagulating enzyme, used for making junket or cheese.

rennet

extract of the abomasal mucosa of the unweaned calf used in curdling milk in the preparation of cheese.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calf rennet has traditionally been the enzyme of choice in cheesemaking.
Potter said that approximately 70 percent of all cheese is produced with FPC, while approximately 25 percent is made with microbial coagulants and the remaining 5 percent is made from calf rennet.
FPC costs more than microbial rennet but less than calf rennet.
that animal rennet is never used in organic cheeses.
It is the presence of a very small quantity of non-organic rennet (and, in some cases, non-organic processing aids and/or preservatives) that leave the cheesemakers unable to claim that their cheeses are 100 percent "USDA Certified Organic.
According to the WCDR, calling fungal-derived rennet 'vegetable rennet' is a misnomer, but it is still very commonly labeled this way.
Organic Valley, for example, uses microbial rennet and animal-derived lipase in its Romano cheese and Blue Cheese Crumbles.
According to the enzyme companies, it appears that very little calf rennet (less than 5 percent) is used anymore in the United States.