effective renal plasma flow

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ef·fec·tive re·nal plas·ma flow (ERPF),

the amount of plasma flowing to the parts of the kidney that have a function in the production of constituents of urine; the clearance of substances such as iodopyracet and p-aminohippuric acid, assuming that the extraction ratio in the peritubular capillaries is 100%.

ef·fec·tive re·nal plas·ma flow

(ERPF) (e-fek'tiv rē'năl plaz'mă flō)
The amount of plasma flowing to the parts of the kidney that have a function in the production of constituents of urine; the clearance of substances such as iodopyracet and p-aminohippuric acid, assuming that the extraction ratio in the peritubular capillaries is 100%.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is well known that strenuous exercise causes marked reductions in renal blood flow which is probably due to renal vasoconstriction (Hisanaga et al.
Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), effective renal blood flow (ERBF), filtration fraction (FF) and urine flow rate in animals treated with rbST under normal shade (NS) and cooling with misters and fans (MF) at different stages of lactation Treatments Lactating period NS NS+rbST MF MF+rbST GFR (ml/min/kg) Early 2.
Preservation of renal blood flow and perfusion pressure prevents deterioration of renal function.
An increased serum creatinine and decreased glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow have been described (2, 4, 5).
Decreases in renal blood flow, another side effect of NSAID use, combined with dehydration, can lead to acute renal failure.
Four weeks later, researchers evaluated single kidney renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rates (GFR) along with renal microvasculature by CT.
Plasma volume increases significantly, leading to a 30-50% increase in cardiac output and resulting in a steady increase in renal blood flow (50% by the mid-second trimester).
Correspondingly, an article providing an historical perspective reports vasoconstriction of arteries following application of high-concentration oxygen can lead to decreased cardiac output, stroke volume and may be linked to reduced cerebral and renal blood flow.
The pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopy decreases renal blood flow, resulting in relative organ ischemia that might precondition the kidney to tolerate longer WITs during laparoscopic procedures.
LUCASSIN is a synthetic vasopressin analogue that acts via the vasopressin V1 receptor as a systemic vasoconstrictor, mainly in the splanchnic (abdominal) circulation, which appears to increase effective arterial volume and improves renal blood flow, thereby improving renal function in patients with HRS.
Renal vascular resistance (RVR) was calculated by the equation: RVR = MAP/RBF, where MAP is the mean arterial pressure and RBF is the renal blood flow.
In 94% of the cases, the physician chose fenoldopam mesylate, a selective dopamine agonist that increases renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rates.