remember

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re·mem·ber

(rĭ-mĕm′bər)
v.
1. To recall to the mind; think of again.
2. To retain in the memory.
3. To return to an original shape or form after being deformed or altered.

Patient discussion about remember

Q. Do you remember the popcorn diet Madonna was on? Can anyone explain how does this diet work?

A. thanks for valuable info!
I searched for it here on iMedix and indeed found several articles about the subject. One of them is: http://www.dietbites.com/article0158.html

Q. I suffer from depression and feel many times that I cannot remember things. Here's another question that I encounter a lot of times: "I suffer from depression and feel many times that I cannot remember things. Is there a relationship between Depression and Alzheimer disease?"

A. Daphna, I appreciate your taking the time for this question. It is something I worry about and just discussed with my doctor last week. I know that for me, some days are more difficult (kind of cloudy) than others. Some days it seems to take me all day to get my daily reading/prayer/meditation done. But I am no longer in a hurry now that I am retired. My doctor said all I needed was a cup of coffee to get going and that always helps me just fine. Walking for me is also very stimulating. Seems like when I get back from a walk, I get a new persective on things. Thanks again Daphna.

Q. I'm having problem remembering how to operate a computer software. Is learning possible only at a young age? I have been trying to learn a new software program that my kids got me but I keep forgetting how to get it started. Is learning possible only at a young age?

A. This is a common concern among older adults. However the answer is actually- not at all. People can learn throughout their life span. In fact, it is important to continue and learn new skills as we age. Learning new skills, like new games, new dances, and a new language, and playing a musical instrument, help keep our mind sharp longer. With age, we may be slower to pick up new information. However, the ability to learn does not go away unless we are inflicted with dementia. It may require more effort but you can continue to learn.

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References in periodicals archive ?
When Rember becomes available, Helen and David believe it will mean the world to families like theirs who could have their mum, dad, partner or grandparent back.
Wis chik, who predicted that Rember would be available within 4 years, said he was count ing on this grandfathered status to speed it through the approval process.
If you are one of the 400,000 people in this country faced with the nightmare of this dreadful condition, then Rember must sound like the answer to a prayer.
Rember is the first drug to act on the tau tangles that develop in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
Rember is the first drug to act on the proteins called tau, which are the building blocks for the neurons that carry messages around.
After 50 weeks, those with both mild and moderate Alzheimer's who were taking rember experienced an 81% reduction in mental decline compared with those placebo.
Rember is the first drugto act on the tau tangles that develop in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
In the first essay, `Coming Home to Sawtooth Valley,' Rember recalls his childhood, when electric power was first brought to the remote valley, when tourists hired his father as a fishing or hunting guide:
Bruce Rember, 85th Group commander, said issues about use of money, facilities, resources and time often reach mutual and amiable conclusions.
bin wearing the Ring the past 18 Years, and the small Ring, i found in New Orleans about 6 Years ago, i hope it will fitt your verry best girl in the world and you will have something to Rember me.
Sandra started on a trial of rember two years ago and believes it has helped her.
Jimmy was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2005, after suffering "blanks" and started on the rember trial in 2006.