ritual

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rit·u·al

(rich'ū-ăl),
In psychiatry and psychology, any repetitive psychomotor activity (for example, hair pulling, handwashing) performed by a person to relieve anxiety, typically seen in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
[L. ritualis, fr. ritus, rite]

ritual

[rich′o̅o̅wəl]
1 a mental health disorder characterized by repetitive sequences of stereotyped daily life routines, such as repeated handwashing, that interferes with an individual's level of functioning.
2 a prescribed order of ceremonial acts or series of acts.
3 a detailed procedure followed faithfully or regularly.

ritual

Psychiatry Repetitive complex movements, often a distorted or stereotyped elaboration of a daily routine, used to relieve anxiety, or seen in obsessive compulsive disorder. See Obsessive-compulsive disorder. Cf Motor tic.

rit·u·al

(rich'ū-ăl)
psychiatry, psychologyAny psychomotor activity (e.g., pathologic handwashing) performed by a person to relieve anxiety or forestall its development; typically seen in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
[L. ritualis, fr. ritus, rite]
References in periodicals archive ?
In accordance with laws and regulations and the principle of protecting the legal, stopping the illegal, containing the extreme, resisting infiltration, and combating crimes, Xinjiang manages religious affairs, protects people's freedom of religious belief, and ensures that normal religious activities proceed in an orderly way.
Perhaps engaging in religious activities, independent of prohibitionary tenets, results in the adoption of healthy lifestyle choices and coping mechanisms, which is consistent with other studies that address the beneficial effects of religious coping (Pargament, 1997).
The Chinese constitution affirms freedom of religion, but only for "normal" religious activities, a term not defined.
The new roles, Lynn claims, "are based on a biased reading of the law [and are] intended to advance inappropriate religious activities in public schools.
Prison inmates brought an action against the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) alleging that the BOP's ban on electric or electronic musical instruments, except those used in connection with religious activities, violated their constitutional rights to free expression and equal protection.
Contractors used three primary strategies for complying with the charitable choice guidelines: 70 percent segregated public finds from funds used for inherently religious purposes, 60 percent provided special staff training, and 57 percent held inherently religious activities at special times.
Justice David Souter accused the majority of repudiating the 1947 Everson ruling, in which all nine justices then agreed that the First Amendment means at least that "no tax in any amount, large or small, can be levied to support any religious activities or institutions, whatever they may be called or whatever form they may adopt to teach or practice religion.
Often these fermented beverages are right at the focal point of feasting and religious activities," he says.
For over 70 years it has been home to the Chapel and Friary, and during that time has accommodated various religious activities.
It was found that out of all those engaged in religious activities online, 69% search for educational or reference material, 50% research other faiths, 35% offer spiritual advice through e-mail and 21% seek out spiritual advice.
We are not proposing that federal money be used to fund religious activities themselves.