relict

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Related to Relicts: Relict distribution, Relict species

relict

(rĕl′ĭkt, rĭ-lĭkt′)
n.
1. Ecology A species that inhabits a much smaller geographic area than it did in the past, often because of environmental change.
2. Something that has survived; a remnant.
3. Law A widow or widower.

relict

see RELIC.
References in periodicals archive ?
This expansion was followed by a postglacial range breakup, retreat to moderate elevations of high mountain systems, and a formation of relict enclaves in smaller hilly areas.
In the Iberian Peninsula, Spanish black pine forests are mainly found in the supramediterranean bioclimatic belt under humid or sub-humid climates (900-1500 m asl), although the relict populations of the Spanish Central System on granitic rocks (Gredos and Guadarrama ranges) are also found under cold perhumid climate (Regato & al.
Microsporidia, it turned out, were nowhere near being relicts.
The majority of these young zircons are characterized by high 176Hf/177Hf isotopic ratios and positive Hf(T) values that are similar to magmatic zircons from the Gangdese batholith, indicating the latter has been a predominant source provenance of the sedimentary relict.
At the end of the experiment, all surviving females were collected and femur length, the number of follicular relicts (eggs laid), and the proportion of functional ovarian follicles determined.
Relicts of scoriaceous agglutinates are preserved on the rims of these vents.
The present findings indicate that some scree spiders in Central Europe could be regarded as relicts of former climatic periods ("glacial relicts").
The cluster analysis allowed the distinction of 32 independent community relicts (10 faunal associations, 17 subsets of associations and 5 faunal assemblages, sensu Fursich, 1984), dominated by bivalves and brachiopods (Table 3).
A Comparison of Blackland Prairie Relicts in Misssissippi and Arkansas.
Moreover, some Michigan herpetological species are undoubtedly in the process of re-occupying new habitats (Holman 1992) while others have been left as relicts since the Middle Holocene warm, dry spell (hypsithermal event) was replaced by a cooler climate, especially the "Little Ice Age" that occurred only a few hundred years ago (Bernabo 1981; Kapp 1999; Holman et al.
During the past 35 years, the least shrew (Cryptotis parva) has expanded its distribution along riverine and other mesic corridors in western parts of its distribution, although some recently discovered populations in the West might represent relicts of a previous Pleistocene distribution.