Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974

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Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974

An Act of (UK) Parliament, which allows as a public policy some criminal convictions to be “spent” after a rehabilitation period (RP), so those convicted of relatively minor offence aren’t faced with lifelong effects of past transgressions.

The RP is determined by the sentence, and begins on the date of the conviction. If there has been no further conviction during the RP, the conviction is spent and, with certain exceptions, need not be disclosed by the ex-offender in any context such as job applications, obtaining insurance, or in civil proceedings. For adults (over 18), the RP is 5 years for non-prison sentences, 7 years for prison sentences of up to 6 months, and 10 years for prison sentences of up to 2 years; convictions are never spent for prison sentences of more than 2 years. For offenders under 18, the RP is usually half that for adults.
References in periodicals archive ?
IT may still be recorded but the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act does not apply to US visa law, so travellers with spent convictions must declare them.
It is vital that any complications arising out of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, the Data Protection Act and any other pieces of legislation that have been used to cloud priorities are removed from the equation.
Under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, people who have been convicted of some offences can regard them as "spent" after a certain period of years.
In Britain, both convictions would be regarded as 'spent' under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, meaning that there is no obligation to disclose them, and that the offences should no longer be held against the person in any way.
They could breach the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act by uncovering "spent" convictions from many years before, which job applicants are not required to reveal to potential employers.
It has now relaunched the cover, so that people only have to disclose current convictions and not ones that are spent under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, rather than all convictions regardless of whether or not they are spent.
There is extensive legislation designed to prevent discrimination, including the Sex Discrimination Acts 1975 and 1986, the Race Relations Act 1976, the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974.
I'm looking to see if the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act can be tightened up to clean up the security industry.
The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 states that any offender who has served a prison sentence of two-and-a-half years or less is legally rehabilitated within five to 10 years.
Most convictions become ``spent'' after a period of time under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act.
Mrs Aaron's 1976 conviction, for which she was fined pounds 10 while studying in London, was 'spent' several years ago under the UK's Rehabilitation of Offenders Act.
The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, which usually prevents such convictions being disclosed after a set time, is not applied.

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