police power

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police power

The constitutional power of the state to abrogate certain individual rights for the common good (e.g., to institutionalise a mentally ill person to prevent harm to self or others).
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start in the development of the modern regulatory state.
systematic and centralized oversight of the regulatory state.
The changes to the modalities of regulation associated with the rise of the regulatory state imply a different role for law.
Safer (1998) also concludes that when choosing between products with high scores in the "luxury" dimension, although with low scores in the "protection" dimension (such as car with leather seats and standard braking system), and products with low scores in the "luxury" dimension, but with high scores in the "protection" dimension (such as a car with advanced braking system, and standard seats), consumers in the promotion regulatory state would tend to choose the first products, while the consumers in the prevention regulatory state would choose the last ones.
Tackling this problem appears to be an important direction for future research on presidential management of the regulatory state.
Thatcher rolled back the regulatory state but not the welfare state.
Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory State and National requirements.
In their analysis of the rise of the regulatory state, Glaeser and
While conservatives must redouble their efforts to reform sloppy and incompetent government and resist government's inherent expansionist tendencies and progressivism's reflexive leveling proclivities, the attempt to dismantle or even substantially roll back the welfare and regulatory state reflects a distinctly unconservative refusal to ground political goals in political realities.
After that, support for what Americans and public officials call a modern government, including the regulatory state, gets little support in Tea Party circles.
30) While there had been an increased awareness on the part of federal regulators regarding the compliance costs of new regulations and some evidence of regulatory parsimony at particular times and in particular agencies, Weidenbaum argues that Congress drove an expanding regulatory state steadily forward in its ambition and reach during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990.