endosperm

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en·do·sperm

(en'dō-spĕrm),
A storage tissue found in many seeds that nourishes the embryo of a plant.

endosperm

a TRIPLOID (1) tissue found in many angiosperm seeds (e.g. those of the castor oil plant), that serves as a food source for the embryo which develops within it. Nonendospermic seeds (e.g. the runner bean) store their food substances within the cotyledons. See EMBRYO SAC for origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grains are divided into two subgroups: whole grains and refined grains.
Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Researcher Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University observed lower volumes of Visceral Adipose Tissue (VAT) in people who chose to eat mostly whole grains instead of refined grains.
That can be confusing because some cereals are low in whole grain because they're high in refined grains or sugar (that's bad).
After 12 weeks, body weight, waist circumference, and body fat percentage had decreased substantially in both groups, but participants in the whole-grain group had about a twofold greater decrease in the percentage of fat in their abdomens compared to those eating refined grains.
Those carbs were mostly coming from added sugars and refined grain.
And the label fails to mention that the "one serving of whole grain" comes with one serving of refined grain .
The Whole Truth: "Good source" or "excellent source" foods often have far more refined grain than whole grain.
Children born to women with gestational diabetes whose pregnancy diet include high proportions of refined grains could be at a higher risk of obesity by age of 7, compared to children born to women who avoided refined grains in their diet, according to a new study.
Refined grain consumption and the metabolic syndrome in urban Asian Indians (Chennai urban rural epidemiology study 57).
Findings on the association between refined grain consumption and risk of chronic diseases are inconsistent (32).
It's only been within the past half century that we've realized just how nutritionally neutered refined grain is.
Over time, eating too much of these refined grain foods can make it harder to control weight and can raise the risk of heart disease and diabetes.