Reed-Sternberg cell


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Related to Reed-Sternberg cell: Hodgkin's lymphoma

Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd shtĕrn'bĕrg),
large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin disease; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cell frequently shows a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stûrn′bûrg′)
n.
A large, abnormal, binucleated or multinucleated B cell that is characteristic of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Reed-Sternberg cell

Etymology: Dorothy M. Reed, American pathologist, 1874-1964; Karl Sternberg, Austrian pathologist, 1872-1935
one of a number of large, abnormal, multinucleated reticuloendothelial cells in the lymphatic system found in Hodgkin's disease. The number and proportion of Reed-Sternberg cells identified are the basis for the histopathological classification of Hodgkin's disease.
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Reed-Sternberg cell

Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd-stĕrn'bĕrg sel)
Large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin lymphoma; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cells frequently show a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).
Enlarge picture
REED-STERNBERG CELL: Reed-Sternberg cell in Hodgkin Lymphoma

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stĕrn′bĕrg″)
[Dorothy Reed, U.S. pathologist, 1874–1964; Karl Sternberg, Aust. pathologist, 1872–1935]
A giant, malignant, multinucleated B lymphocyte, the presence of which is the pathologic hallmark of Hodgkin's disease.
See: illustration

Reed-Sternberg cell

A giant cell with paired, mirror-image nuclei that is a diagnostic feature of HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA and distinguishes it from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Dorothy M. Reed, 1874–1964, American pathologist; and Karl von Sternberg, 1872–1935, Austrian pathologist).

Reed-Sternberg cell

see Reed-Sternberg cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gene usage of the Reed-Sternberg cell is very similar to that of the antibody producing B-cell and is distinctly different from all other cells of the immune system and those found in other tissues of the human body.
This has allowed detection of diploid, hyperdiploid, and aneuploid peaks, with aneuploid peaks maintaining their identity on multiple biopsies, supporting a hypothesis that Hodgkin lymphoma may contain multiple or serial subpopulations of clonal Reed-Sternberg cells simultaneously.
These authors suggested that the 2 diseases were likely clonally unrelated, since the expert opinion at that time was that Reed-Sternberg cells were not B cells--an opinion now considered to be incorrect.
Careful consideration of the clinical history, as well as the presence of lacunar Reed-Sternberg cells in nodules surrounded by dense collagenous fibrosis, should suggest the diagnosis.
Nevertheless, the confirmation of HL requires morphologic diagnosis of the neoplastic cells with the appropriate cellular background along with the result of immunophenotyping as cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells can be found in cases of B and T lymphomas, melanomas, sarcoma, and in some reactive conditions such as infectious mononucleosis, which are common in populations across the globe (6).
Seven mesenteric lymph nodes were recovered that showed polymorphous infiltrate of lymphoid cells, eosinophils, and plasma cells, with scattered diagnostic Reed-Sternberg cells.
This correlates with a previous study that detected gp350/220 mRNA by RT-PCR in only 1 of 10 biopsies, whereas the immediate-early protein ZEBRA was detected in Reed-Sternberg cells in 3 of 40 biopsies of Hodgkin disease, confirming that viral replication in EBV-associated Hodgkin disease is a rare event (19, 28).
The absence of Reed-Sternberg cells helps distinguish Kimura's disease from Hodgkin's disease.
The CD30 antigen is known to be expressed on the Reed-Sternberg cells of HL and on sALCL, an aggressive type of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Hodgkin's lymphoma caused by Hodgkin cells or reed-Sternberg cells (H-RS) and is one of the white blood cell malignancies.
Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignant proliferation of Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants, Hodgkin cells, in an inflammatory cellular background, and is characterized by a progressive painless enlargement of lymph nodes.