distributive justice

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distributive justice

(dis-trib′yŭ-tiv)
The ethical concept that favors the value of doing some good for a community, as opposed to doing great good for an individual. It may be illustrated by the dilemma of providing a costly organ transplant to save the life of one person versus providing vaccination against polio to thousands of others. When monetary resources are limited, health care planners, providers, and patients compete for those resources and must decide whether to concentrate them on a single major task or distribute them broadly to the population at large.
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In the next part of the paper, I lay out Fraser's framework through her early work on her framework of recognition and redistributive justice (Fraser, N, 1997a).
Fraser then poses a dilemma between recognition and redistributive justice claims.
Redistributive justice and 'trickle down' were simply not the issues.
They argue, however, that communicative action, an approach that has gained some credibiiity as an emergent paradigm over recent years, does not sufficiently provide for intercultural relations; and they argue for planners to embrace notions of redistributive justice.
Bitter debates between the 'social Left' and the 'cultural Left', between proponents of class politics and advocates of identity politics, between theorists of redistributive justice and thinkers of cultural recognition, have divided progressive thought throughout the 1990s and into this decade.
Having deployed the needless-means response against the claim that state power is needed to provide social order, de Jasay devotes parts 2 through 4 to examining claims that state power is needed to provide redistributive justice.
The objectives of a cooperative federalism may be better served by replacing the current deadlocked parliament with a grand council of regional spokespersons, supplemented by institutional mechanisms that can arbitrate issues of redistributive justice, equity, and civil liberties for all the regional peoples.
Some authors make the argument that redistributive justice requires global democracy, while others suggest that a revised statism can adequately serve the purposes of justice.
We suggest going beyond current liberal Western notions of rationality and justice to explore notions of conflicting rationalities and redistributive justice.
We suggest going beyond current liberal Western notions of rationality and justice to explore conflicting rationalities (a la Watson 2003) and redistributive justice.
Ethical politics is in fact the field constituted by the tension between redistributive justice and the struggle for recognition.
recent development plans in Pakistan have been successful, if negative, the answer draws attention to the failure of development planning to carry out redistributive justice.