earthworm

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Related to Red wiggler: Vermiculture, Eisenia fetida

earthworm

(ûrth′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various terrestrial annelid worms of the class Oligochaeta, especially those of the family Lumbricidae, that burrow into and help aerate and enrich soil.

earthworm

any ANNELID of the order Oligochaeta.

earthworm

the common oligochete worm of the genera Lumbricus, Allobophora, Eisenia etc.; they act as intermediate hosts for a number of internal parasites of livestock, and are reputed to bring anthrax spores to the surface and precipitate an outbreak of the disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
A pound of red wigglers is $35, including shipping and handling.
After starting out with soil which may have been suitable for making bricks, I now have that "chocolate cake-type" soil, brimming over with nightcrawlers and red wigglers (the Cadillac of worms
Aspiring vermicomposters are instructed to purchase a starter herd of red wigglers (Eisenia fetida), a species well suited to the mission and conditions in contained bins.
Red worms or red wigglers are the worms most often recommended for vermicomposting--composting that uses worms to do all the heavy lifting.
The night crawlers, red wigglers or gray worms are just a few representatives of a large group of earthworms.
1 pound red wigglers (Available at bait shops, or order from
The fee is $20, and will include a worm bin and supply of red wigglers.
Red worms or red wigglers will turn those banana peels and apple cores into rich compost that can be used next spring.
Dickerson also recommends starting a worm farm under the rabbit cages, using red wigglers (Eisenia fetida) from bait stores.
For bin-based vermiculture, it is generally recommended that folks use red wigglers (Eisenia foetida).
I did my best, initially, to follow the vermiculture creed, feeding my red wigglers measured portions of their favorite kitchen scraps and layering in just the right amount of carefully torn soy-ink newspaper strips for bedding.