Solenopsis invicta

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Solenopsis invicta

the red imported fire ant, a species imported from South America that has spread extensively within the southeastern U.S. where it has become a major pest of humans and animals; it readily stings humans, producing local swelling and pruritus with development of a pustule at the site of the sting and, in rare cases, it can cause anaphylactic shock with death from respiratory or cardiac arrest.
See also: Solenopsis richteri.

So·le·nop·sis in·vic·ta

(sōl-ĕ-nop'sis in-vik'tă)
The red fire ant, a species imported from South America that has spread extensively within the southeastern United States, where it has become a major pest of humans and animals; it readily stings humans, producing local swelling and pruritus with development of a pustule at the site of the sting and, in rare cases, can cause anaphylactic shock with death from respiratory or cardiac arrest.
See also: Solenopsis richteri
Synonym(s): red fire ant.

Solenopsis invicta

The red imported fire ant, introduced into the southern U.S. in the 1930s. Its bite can cause welts or, in some instances, generalized anaphylaxis. See: fire ant bite
See also: Solenopsis

Solenopsis invicta

fire ant; capable of causing damage to the conjunctiva in recumbent newborn animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Impact of the red imported fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on epigeic arthropods of cotton agroecosystems.
Working with APHIS laboratory director Anne-Marie Callcott and CMAVE entomologist Charles Strong, Valles used these antibodies to develop a portable, easy-to-use test kit that identifies red imported fire ants in 10 minutes.
Patch use under predation hazard: effect of the red imported fire ant on deer mouse foraging behavior.
Red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) are polymorphic (Tschinkel, 1988) and exhibit allometric castes (Tschinkel, 2003); therefore, they are an ideal species in which to study the influence of body size on intraspecific thermal maxima.
Many Americans who live in southern states are familiar with the distinct mounds built by red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta (Figure 1).
For a little more than a decade, wildlife and conservation officials have been sounding the alarm in a series of increasingly compelling public information campaigns, which warn against the accidental or purposeful importation of such invasive species as the brown tree snake, the red imported fire ant and the biting sand fly, among others.
Red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta--"invicta" being the Latin for undefeated or unconquered) appeared in two locations almost simultaneously.
TIP OF THE WEEK: The California Department of Food and Agriculture has issued a red imported fire ant warning for all of Southern California.
Since its accidental introduction at the port of Mobile, Alabama, circa 1940 (Buren 1972; Rhoades 1977), the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta has expanded its range in the United States to > 100 million ha (Vinson 1997).
The deer mouse is a common cricetine rodent whose geographical range and temporal activity overlap extensively with that of the red imported fire ant in the southeastern United States (Grzimek 1990).