Procambarus clarkii

(redirected from Red Swamp Crayfish)

Procambarus clarkii

farmed crustacean in family Astacidae; called also red swamp crawfish. See Table 23.
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Effect of feeding cooked-extruded diets, containing different levels of protein, lipid and carbohydrate on growth of red swamp crayfish (Procamharus clarkii).
Red swamp crayfish are also showing up in many of Oregon's waterways; environmentalists suspect well-meaning teachers and students are releasing them at the end of the school year.
Juvenile red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) were obtained from a commercial supplier (Atchafalaya Biological Supply, Raceland, LA), and kept in communal tanks.
There doesn't seem to be any specific information regarding the impact of red-claws on reproductive success of our particular assemblage of fish species, although another exotic and invasive species of crayfish, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), is known to cause disruptions in tilapia populations, including Oreochromis niloticus, in the Nile.
The results indicate that red swamp crayfish presence or removals do not affect water quality or nutrient levels in Topanga Creek.
The common red swamp crayfish can mature in just three months.
Invertebrates consisted of a variety of groups including micro-crustaceans (copepods, ostracods, and Daphnia), red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarki), Corbiculidae (Corbicula fluminea), tapeworms, dipteran larvae and adults, Notonectidae, and odonate nymphs and adults.
Red swamp crayfish has 2 pairs of sensory antennae, compound eyes, 2 large pincers or claws called chelipeds, 8 jointed walking legs, a segmented body, and tail.
Population biology and production of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) in the lower Mondego river valley, Portugal.
But even this display of bravado is no match for invasive species such as western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna), which have became established in most springs and compete for the same resources needed by native species.
Red swamp crayfish, a native of the south-eastern United States, have been spotted in the Regent's Canal in central London, raising fears that they could spread across the country along waterways.
Karyological study of the red swamp crayfish and the Japanese lobster by air-drying method.