recombinant DNA

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re·com·bi·nant DNA

altered DNA resulting from the insertion into the chain, by chemical, enzymatic, or biologic means, of a sequence (a whole or partial chain of DNA) not originally (biologically) present in that chain.

recombinant DNA

n. Abbr. rDNA
Genetically engineered DNA prepared by transplanting or splicing genes from one species into the cells of a host organism of a different species. Such DNA becomes part of the host's genetic makeup and is replicated.

recombinant DNA

a DNA molecule in which rearrangement of the genes has been experimentally induced. Enzymes are used to break isolated DNA molecules into fragments that are then rearranged in the desired sequence. DNA sequences from another organism of the same or a different species may also be introduced into the molecule, which is then replicated, resulting in both genotypic and phenotypic alterations in the organism that carries the recombinant DNA. See also genetic engineering.

recombinant DNA

DNA produced by the artificial linkage, in the laboratory or factory, of DNA from different sources. See also GENETIC ENGINEERING.

recombinant DNA

  1. DNA produced by joining together DNA sequences from different sources in vitro; often this involves VECTOR (2) DNA and foreign DNA to form a recombinant vector for use in GENETIC ENGINEERING.
  2. DNA produced by natural RECOMBINATION in vivo.

recombinant DNA

DNA transformed by insertion of a sequence of additional/foreign DNA
References in periodicals archive ?
The remaining three coordination sites are usually occupied by water molecules and can be exchanged with histidine residues of the recombinant protein.
Zhang uses tobacco in his research because it is a non-food crop and is well suited as a "factory" for recombinant protein production.
In the field of recombinant protein and monoclonal antibody therapeutics, RAFAGEN's technology will facilitate a marked increase in drug production from manufacturing facilities.
ProdiGene, headquartered in College Station, TX, is the first company in the world to successfully commercialize recombinant proteins from genetically enhanced plants.
In addition to research into recombinant protein biomanufacturing, Phytomedics has developed a broad range of integrated life science biotechnologies for applications such as pharmaceutical and agrichemical discovery, gene amplification for crop engineering, bioactive peptide development, and production of scientifically optimized nutraceuticals.
These agreements allow Sanofi-Pasteur and GSK to implement the StabyExpress technology for recombinant proteins productions, therefore being able to produce efficiently without the use of antibiotics.
ProdiGene uses transgenic plants to manufacture a full array of active and complex recombinant proteins efficiently and economically.
Ajinomoto AminoScience LLC (AAS) today announced the availability of a case study profiling how one global pharmaceutical company relied on the Corynex(TM)Recombinant Protein Expression System to simplify the development of recombinant proteins.
Using genetic material from humans, jellyfish, and microbes, PHI is engineering the roots of plants to continuously produce and exude large quantities of recombinant proteins into a hydroponic medium.
It specializes in the use of a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) and scale-up production of recombinant proteins for use as diagnostic reagents in pre-clinical research, as well as for protein-protein interaction studies, protein (including enzyme) structure-function studies, crystallization and vaccine development.
Corynex Recombinant Protein Expression System is a streamlined, more efficient process to produce complex recombinant proteins for pharmaceutical applications using a specially-developed gram-positive bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum.
The Phage portfolio includes ten standard-of-care recombinant proteins, such as pegylated human growth hormone, pegylated G-CSF, pegylated interferon alpha, beta interferon, and single-chain antibodies (which will compete with monoclonal antibodies).

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