recession

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recession

 [re-sesh´un]
the drawing away of a tissue or part from its normal position.
gingival recession the drawing back of the gingivae from the necks of the teeth, with exposure of root surfaces.

re·ces·sion

(rē-sesh'ŭn),
A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction.
[L. recessio (see recessus)]

re·ces·sion

(rĕ-sesh'ŭn)
1. A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction
2. Surgical operation in which an extaocular muscle is detached from the globe and reattached posteriorly.
3. Loss of gingiva on a tooth apically; measurement is made using a probe; findings are recorded as attachment loss.

recession

Surgical retroplacement of a part, especially the insertion of a muscle so as to weaken its action.

recession 

A surgical procedure used in strabismus in which an extraocular muscle is removed from its insertion and repositioned elsewhere on the globe, posteriorly to weaken it and anteriorly to strengthen it (called advancement procedure). See resection; strabismus surgery.

gin·gi·val re·ces·sion

(jinji-văl rĕ-seshŭn)
Apical migration of the gingiva along the tooth surface, with exposure of the tooth surface.
Synonym(s): gingival atrophy, gingival resorption.

recession (rēsesh´ən),

n a moving back or withdrawal.
recession, bone,
n apical progression of the level of the alveolar crest associated with inflammatory and dystrophic periodontal disease; a bone resorption process that results in decreased osseous support for the tooth.
recession, gingival,
n atrophy of the gingival margin associated with inflammation, apical migration (proliferation) of the epithelial attachment, and resorption of the alveolar crest.
recession, periimplant,
n the loss of gingival tissues around a dental implant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bry-Boschan method--like the NBER--typically dates recessions with a substantial lag.
The all-encompassing nature of that downturn stands in contrast to the prior four national recessions.
Here real GDP statistics, referred to as "volume estimates," similarly indicate that a recession occurred in the United States during the second and third quarters of 1980 and a double-dip recession from the fourth quarter of 1981 through the third quarter of 1982.
We expect to see a similar relationship between these variables over the course of the recovery as they had during the recessions, though with the opposite sign.
Stovall says there are two key factors missing from the current economic landscape and from forecasts that argue against an economic recession even if there is a recession in profits: the U.
That was the longest recession on record since the Great Depression.
Ball suggests that recessions sharply reduce capital accumulation, have long-term effects on employment--largely through lower labor force participation--and may slow the growth of total-factor productivity.
The Great Recession disproportionately affected household wealth, unemployment rates, and health insurance coverage of minorities.
We then proceed with quantifying the potential shifts in the mean and the slope coefficients of Okun's law during the recessions by estimating equations (5) through (7).
In which case, the indicator may not signal a recession.
As in many other papers, I use a probit model with a binary variable getting the value of one during recessions as the dependent variable.
Past recessions hampered states' ability to fund increased Medicaid enrollment and maintain existing services.