recession

(redirected from Recessions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

recession

 [re-sesh´un]
the drawing away of a tissue or part from its normal position.
gingival recession the drawing back of the gingivae from the necks of the teeth, with exposure of root surfaces.

re·ces·sion

(rē-sesh'ŭn),
A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction.
[L. recessio (see recessus)]

re·ces·sion

(rĕ-sesh'ŭn)
1. A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction
2. Surgical operation in which an extaocular muscle is detached from the globe and reattached posteriorly.
3. Loss of gingiva on a tooth apically; measurement is made using a probe; findings are recorded as attachment loss.

recession

Surgical retroplacement of a part, especially the insertion of a muscle so as to weaken its action.

recession 

A surgical procedure used in strabismus in which an extraocular muscle is removed from its insertion and repositioned elsewhere on the globe, posteriorly to weaken it and anteriorly to strengthen it (called advancement procedure). See resection; strabismus surgery.

gin·gi·val re·ces·sion

(jinji-văl rĕ-seshŭn)
Apical migration of the gingiva along the tooth surface, with exposure of the tooth surface.
Synonym(s): gingival atrophy, gingival resorption.

recession (rēsesh´ən),

n a moving back or withdrawal.
recession, bone,
n apical progression of the level of the alveolar crest associated with inflammatory and dystrophic periodontal disease; a bone resorption process that results in decreased osseous support for the tooth.
recession, gingival,
n atrophy of the gingival margin associated with inflammation, apical migration (proliferation) of the epithelial attachment, and resorption of the alveolar crest.
recession, periimplant,
n the loss of gingival tissues around a dental implant.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, we find a tighter relationship between average GDP growth and improvements in labor market measures within the first year of the recovery relative to the recessions.
For many nonprofits a recession is a drawn-out period of painful cuts and adjustments and reductions in revenue and then it's over.
This is the first study to investigate the association between the Great Recession and the heterogeneous impact along the health spending distribution of different populations.
economic history to determine how the recessions alter the behavior of Okun's law.
Some other important indicators related to jobs and consumer confidence are not yet clearly pointing towards a recession.
The forecasts were most inaccurate during the first several months of the recessions.
As legislators know very well, state fiscal conditions do not respond immediately to the end of a recession.
economic downturn than has occurred in previous recessions.
To find a difference that sheds some light on future labor market recovery, we look into the different factors that contribute to the rise in the unemployment rate during recessions.
There is clear evidence that private-label OTCs grow at significant rates during a recession.
The TUC's latest recession report uses official figures to compare the current recession with those of the 1980s and the 1990s.
Of these recessions five of them were major for the UK: post war 1919-1921; Wall Street crash 1929-1931; the financial crisis of the 1970s; recession in the 1980s (technically two recessions) and the recessions of the 1990s.