interleukin

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interleukin

 [in´ter-loo″kin]
one of several proteins important for lymphocyte proliferation. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is produced by macrophages and induces the production of interleukin-2 by T cells that have been stimulated by antigen or mitogen. Interleukin-2 (IL-2), produced by T cells, stimulates the proliferation of T cells bearing specific receptors for IL-2; these receptors are expressed in response to antigenic stimulation. IL-2 also seems to induce the production of interferon and is used as an anticancer drug in the treatment of a wide variety of solid malignant tumors. Another interleukin, interleukin-3 (IL-3) is necessary for the differentiation of suppressor T cells.

in·ter·leu·kin (IL),

(in'tĕr-lū'kin),
The name given to a group of multifunctional cytokines after their amino acid structure is known. They are synthesized by lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and certain other cells. See: lymphokine, cytokine.
[inter- + leukocyte + -in]

interleukin

/in·ter·leu·kin/ (-loo´kin) a generic term for a group of multifunctional cytokines that are produced by a variety of lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells and whose effects occur at least partly within the lymphopoietic system.
interleukin-2  (IL-2) one produced by T cells in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation, acting to regulate the immune response. It stimulates the proliferation of T cells and the synthesis of other T cell–derived cytokines, stimulates the growth and cytolytic function of NK cells to produce lymphokine-activated killer cells, is a growth factor for and stimulates antibody synthesis in B cells, and may promote apoptosis in antigen-activated T cells; it is used pharmaceutically as an antineoplastic.

interleukin

(ĭn′tər-lo͞o′kĭn)
n.
Any of various small proteins that are produced by a variety of cell types, especially T cells and other white blood cells, and that regulate many aspects of inflammation and the immune response, including stimulating the production of white blood cells and platelets.

interleukin

[-lo̅o̅′kin]
one of a large group of proteins produced mainly by T cells and in some cases by mononuclear phagocytes or other cells. Interleukins participate in communication among leukocytes and are important in the inflammatory response. Most interleukins direct other cells to divide and differentiate. Each acts on a particular group of cells that have receptors specific to that interleukin.

interleukin

Immunology Any of a family of cytokines produced by lymphocytes, monocytes, and other cells, which induce growth and differentiation of lymphoid cells and primitive hematopoietic stem cells;. See Biological response modifier.

in·ter·leu·kin

(IL) (in'tĕr-lū'kin)
The name given to a group of multifunctional cytokines after their amino acid structure is known. They are synthesized by lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and some other cells.
See also: lymphokine, cytokine
[inter- + leukocyte + -in]

interleukin (in·tr·lōōˑ·kin),

n any of the family of proteins produced by lymphocytes and macrophages in the presence of antigens; responsible for T-cell proliferation.

in·ter·leu·kin

(IL) (in'tĕr-lū'kin)
Group of eight multifunctional cytokines designated after their amino acid structure is known. They are synthesized by lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and some other cells.
See: cytokine
[inter- + leukocyte + -in]