receptive field

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receptive field

that part of the retina of which the photoreceptors (rods and cones) pertain to a single optic nerve fiber. The response of a neuron to stimulation of its receptive field depends on the type of neuron and the part of the field that is illuminated; an "on-center" neuron is stimulated by light falling at the center of its receptive field and inhibited by light falling at the periphery; an "off-center" neuron reacts in exactly the opposite fashion; that is, it is inhibited by light falling at the center of its receptive field. In either case, the net response depends on a complex switching action in the retina. When an entire receptive field is equally illuminated, the response of receptors at the center of the field predominates.

receptive field

A description of the effective stimuli of a given neuron. For sensory receptor neurons, the receptive field is the type of effective stimulation (e.g., light, sound, mechanical pressure) and the range of sensitive locations (e.g., center of visual field, left auditory field, tip of right thumb).
See also: field

receptive field

an area of the body surface over which a single sensory receptor, or its afferent nerve fiber, is capable of sensing stimuli. In some body area, e.g. face, ears, front paws, the sensitive areas are small; over the back they are larger.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the object is larger, it may encroach onto more than one spotlight at the same time--this is the same with a large object being detected by many bipolar cells, and, therefore, falling within many receptive fields.
During the outgoing phase, we will use 2-photon calcium imaging together with fluorescent labeled interneurons and optogenetics technologies to dissect out, in the mouse V1, the specific role of two interneurons subtypes (parvalbumin- (PV+) and calretinin-expressing (CR+)) in the orientation tuning and the emergence of simple-like receptive fields in pyramidal cells.
These receptive fields of visual cortex contain multiple bands of excitatory and inhibitory areas which act as line detectors.
Key themes include the history of Gestalt theory and it relevance to contemporary neuroscience, the relationship between perceptive and receptive fields, the spatiotemporal unity of perception, self-organizing properties of the visual field, the role of attention and perceptual grouping in forming non-retinotopic representations, figural distortions following adaptation to spatial patterns, illusory changes of brightness in spatial patterns, the function of motion illusions as a tool to study Gestalt principles in vision, conflicting theories of color vision and the neural basis of it, the role of color in figure-ground segmentation, chromatic assimilation of visual art and perception, and the phenomena of colored shadows.
He said that in earlier stages of processing, these windows - known as receptive fields - are small and only have access to info within a restricted region of space.
Employing a microscopic electrode array to record the activity of retinal ganglion cells - each of which views the world only through a small, jagged window called a receptive field - he was able to show that receptive fields fit together like pieces of a puzzle, preventing blind spots and excessive overlap that could blur our perception of the world.
Rabins suggested that the de-enervation hallucinations resulted from the spontaneous discharge of cells in the altered cortical receptive fields.
Some chapter topics are brain vesicular monoamine transporters and apoptosis, semantically mediated integration of cognition, control of cortical synaptic receptive fields by neuromodulation and patterned sensory input, links between Down syndrome and Alzheimer's, and mind wandering in the default state.
Receptive fields of cells in striate cortex of very young, visually inexperienced kittens.
The theory of expanding receptive fields perhaps best explains how a local injury gets translated into a generalized syndrome like fibromyalgia.
These illusory contrast effects can be taken as an example of the constructive (or adaptive) nature of perception, and they have inspired an enormous amount of research so that we now understand the dependence of the phenomena upon the concentric organization of excitatory regions and lateral inhibitory surrounds, making up neuron receptive fields in the retina (Cornsweet, 1970; Ratlift, 1965).
In addition, studies have noted changes in the receptive fields of input deprived spinal cord neurons carrying information to the CNS [Carlen, et al.