rebreathing

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re·breath·ing

(rē-brēdh'ing),
Inhalation of part or all of gases previously exhaled.

rebreathing

[rēbrē′thing]
Etymology: L, re + AS, braeth, breath
breathing in a closed system. Exhaled gas mixes with the gas in the system, and some of this mixture is then reinhaled. Rebreathing, which may result in progressively decreasing concentrations of oxygen and progressively increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the blood, can occur in poorly ventilated environments.

re·breath·ing

(rē-brēdh'ing)
Inhalation of gases, partially or completely previously exhaled.

rebreathing

inhalation of previously expired air:
  • as in rescue breathing (where rescuer exhales air into the lungs of a subject in respiratory failure); see basic life support

  • to control dizziness and digital paraesthesia induced by hyperventilation; the subject re-inhales expired air (from cupped hands, or from a paper bag) to reverse the effects of exhaling excess carbon dioxide (see hyperventilation)

re·breath·ing

(rē-brēdh'ing)
Inhalation of part or all of gases previously exhaled.

rebreathing,

n breathing into a closed system. Exhaled gas mixes with the gas in the closed system, and some of this mixture is then reinhaled. Rebreathing is used as part of a general anesthesia technique in which a rebreathing bag functions as a reservoir for anesthetic gases and oxygen. The bag may be squeezed or pumped to assist in proper respiration while the patient is under deep anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The commonality in these studies was that 6 of the 8 were conducted using acetylene rebreathe and 5 of the 8 were conducted using a supramaximal protocol (wherein a supramaximal bout of exercise is conducted after a short rest period).
Breathing into a paper bag lets you rebreathe some of your exhaled air, which is high in carbon dioxide.
Sheepskin and other types of soft bedding can slowly suffocate children who rebreathe their own oxygen-depleted air.
The researchers conclude that both products studied would trap exhaled air, allowing infants to rebreathe potentially lethal amounts of carbon dioxide.
Traditional sheets, bumpers and pads are dangerous because they have the potential to trap carbon dioxide which can cause a baby to rebreathe deadly exhaled air and asphyxiate, or suffocate, or they can become loose and pose a strangulation risk.