Raynaud phenomenon


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Related to Raynaud phenomenon: Buerger's disease

Ray·naud phe·nom·e·non

(rā-nō'),
spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold. Fingers become variably red, white, and blue.

Raynaud phenomenon

Raynaud's disease Cardiovascular disease A condition characterized by vasospasm of small vessels of the fingers and toes, resulting in skin discoloration Etiology Extreme temperatures–especially cold or hot or emotional events; initially, digits involved turn white because of ↓ blood supply, then blue because of prolonged hypoxia, then red, when the blood vessels reopen, causing a local flushing

Ray·naud phe·nom·e·non

(rā-nō' fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
Spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold. Fingers become variably red, white, and blue.
See also: Raynaud syndrome
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RAYNAUD PHENOMENON

Raynaud phenomenon

Intermittent attacks of pallor or cyanosis of the small arteries and arterioles of the fingers as the result of inadequate arterial blood flow. This condition is associated with scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, Buerger disease, nerve entrapment, and anorexia-bulimia. The signs, symptoms, and treatment are identical to those of Raynaud disease. illustration;

Raynaud,

Maurice, French physician, 1834-1881.
Raynaud disease - Synonym(s): Raynaud syndrome
Raynaud gangrene - Synonym(s): Raynaud syndrome
Raynaud phenomenon - spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold.
Raynaud sign - Synonym(s): acrocyanosis
Raynaud syndrome - idiopathic paroxysmal bilateral cyanosis of the digits. Synonym(s): Raynaud disease; Raynaud gangrene; symmetric asphyxia

Ray·naud phe·nom·e·non

(rā-nō' fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
Spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold. Fingers are variably colored red, white, and blue.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are a couple factors that may have contributed to our patient's unique presentation of Raynaud phenomenon followed by DVT and PE.
As a result internal organs may be affected and many with systemic scleroderma are sensitive to cold and some experience a color change in their fingers or toes upon cold exposure or stress known as Raynaud Phenomenon.
Hence, systemic lupus erythematosus, discoid lupus erythematosus, scleroderma/CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal motility abnormalities, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia), Raynaud syndrome, SS, MCTD, overlap CTD syndromes, polymyositis, and dermatomyositis were considered disease-positive [11] and all other diagnoses were considered disease-negative.