turnover rate

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turnover rate

an assessment of the ability of an enzyme to catalyse a reaction, as measured by the number of molecules of substrate which react per second at one ACTIVE SITE when the enzyme is saturated with substrate. The turnover rate varies widely between different enzymes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, she adds that several companies are now touting their low rates of turnover.
Other challenges that have slowed the adoption of these technologies are record litigation expenses, adjusting from a cost-based to a margin-driven business model, a full-employment economy that supports high rates of turnover, and increasingly complex regulations.
Unethical business practices, communication challenges, high rates of turnover, unprofessional behavior and poor management are common in both company types.
The importance of gaining a better understanding of the factors related to recruitment, motivation, and retention of manufacturing employees is further underscored by rising personnel costs and high rates of turnover (Alwin and Hauser, 1975; Bartol, 1983; Billings and Wroten, 1978; Blau and Boal, 1989; Conger, 1990; Shore and Martin, 1989).
One logical indicator of this environment is the rate of turnover; less favorable environments can be expected to result in higher rates of turnover by women.
Succeeding sections, then, are organized as follows: 1) an overview of the management of employee turnover particularly as regards whether it may be viewed as functional or dysfunctional to the organization; 2) an overview of transfer focusing on the relationship, if any, between employee transfer behavior and subsequent rates of turnover and absenteeism; 3) a discussion of the extent to which employee absenteeism is subject to effective intervention by changes in absenteeism policy in the workplace; 4) an examination of the relationship, if any, between absence rates and subsequent turnover; and, 5) an intervention model of the interdependence of turnover, transfer, and absenteeism.