Rastafarian

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Rastafarian

(răs-tă-fă′rē-ăn)
A religious cult that originated in Jamaica in the 1930s and has members in the Caribbean, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. It is of medical importance because cult members' dietary practices may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency with subsequent neurological disease, megaloblastic anemia, or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) The original Rastafarians were largely black ex-slaves occupying the lowest strata of Jamaican society and influenced by Garvey's "Back to Africa" movement, which was meant to instil black pride.
A STAR of last night's Britain's Got Talent once had his act cut short after he used offensive racist jokes and ran about in a Rastafarian wig.
There were no reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice, and prominent societal leaders took positive steps to promote religious freedom; however, Rastafarians complained of discrimination, especially in hiring and in schools.
Others wore hand-bands, jewellery and T-shirts decorated with the Ethiopian national flag and Rastafarian colours of green, yellow and red.
What is remarkable about the journey of Rastafarians from 'outcasts' to 'culture bearers' is the astonishingly short amount of time that it has taken.
Pointing out a picture of Midland MP Lynne Jones - who has campaigned to decriminalise cannabis possession - in his office, Mr Napthali said: 'Smoking the weed is not compulsory for Rastafarians but it is an old tradition which has been documented in the Bible itself.
From Brooklyn we'll fly you to the lush tropical hills of Jamaica to reggae with home-grown Rastafarians.
Of what relevance are Hebrew Psalms to the non-Jewish neo-Christian indigenous Rastafarians whose anti-Christian rhetoric, nonetheless, depends heavily on the Bible for its self-definition and ideology?
Will Rastafarians demand the inclusion of ritualistic marijuana cigarettes in their rations?
Indeed, as noted below, Rastafarians have come to symbolize West Indians in modern American films; and it is likely that the driving force behind the creation of this skewed image has been the entertainment industry, which has sought to capitalize on Rastafarians' exotic looks and the popularity of reggae music.
His solution is to invent a two-line verse form, one that is very flexible, for not only does he make references to reggae and Rastafarians in the work but one can also hear the music in the lines.
A small but stable number of citizens identify themselves as Rastafarians, while some members of the small resident Guyanese and Indian populations practice Hinduism and other South Asian religions.