Rastafarian

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Rastafarian

(răs-tă-fă′rē-ăn)
A religious cult that originated in Jamaica in the 1930s and has members in the Caribbean, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. It is of medical importance because cult members' dietary practices may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency with subsequent neurological disease, megaloblastic anemia, or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
Others wore hand-bands, jewellery and T-shirts decorated with the Ethiopian national flag and Rastafarian colours of green, yellow and red.
There are about 400,000 Rastafarians worldwide and their goal is to return to Ethiopia when the new world order begins this century.
As a leading authority on the Rastafarians comments, "The Hebrew Bible remains an indispensable source of inspiration for Rastafarians (as for Jews), in the same way that the New Testament does for Christians.
Some Rastafarians claimed discrimination by the Government, citing obligatory haircuts, police harassment, and unequal treatment of Rastafarian students.
Despite Matisyahu's reggae sound, Rastafarians did not dominate the crowd - and neither did the smell of marijuana.
Arguably Rastafarianism counts as a 'religious belief or similar philosophical belief' under these laws and Rastafarians smoke marijuana for religious purposes.
Rastafarians such as the Jamaicanborn musician consider Haile Selassie's birthplace, Ethiopia, as their spiritual home.
The town, 155 miles south of the capital Addis Ababa, has been home to hundreds of Rastafarians since Haile Selassie gave them land there.
Rita Marley said her husband would be reburied in Shashemene, 155 miles south of the capital, where several hundred Rastafarians have lived since they were given land by Ethiopia's last emperor, Haile Selassie.
Arguably, Rastafarianism counts as a `religious belief or similar philosophical belief' under these laws and Rastafarians smoke marijuana for religious purposes.
Most cheered and waved flags and only a small group of about 20 Rastafarians were more interested in demanding "repatriation", with cash help from the Queen, to their spiritual home of Ethiopia.
Haile Selassie, the former ruler of Ethiopia, is worshipped by Caribbean Rastafarians as the manifestation of God.