Rastafarian

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Rastafarian

(răs-tă-fă′rē-ăn)
A religious cult that originated in Jamaica in the 1930s and has members in the Caribbean, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. It is of medical importance because cult members' dietary practices may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency with subsequent neurological disease, megaloblastic anemia, or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rastafarianism that sit and do nothing is a Black man sell out.
Much as Catholic and Protestant doctrine and liturgy gave rise to many of the landmark musical works of the Renaissance and baroque periods, so Rastafarianism formed the philosophical foundation for most of the truly noteworthy works in the reggae canon.
Latching onto Ethiopia's independence and the belief that Selassie fulfilled biblical prophecy, Jamaicans created a new religion, Rastafarianism, with Haile Selassie as its divine head.
The dread culture of Rastafarianism is given as an example of "a radical politics capable of universalising the issue of emancipation beyond the primary question of racial or ethnic particularity" (Gilroy 1987: 198).
Guam has reportedly won its appeal case against a Rastafarian who claimed that a charge of drug possession violated his right to freely exercise his religion - Rastafarianism.
The highlight of this book is the treatment of nontraditional religions, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Native American Spirituality, Wicca, Rastafarianism and Satanism.
The parties had stipulated to the fact that Rastafarianism emphasizes the use of marijuana in ceremonies designed to bring the believer closer to the divinity and to enhance unity among believers.
The staff a Fazakerley Hospital have been issued guidelines on everything from Hari Krishna to Rastafarianism.
Throughout this time, Marley strove to remain true to his roots: His music was both issue-oriented (wife Rita says, ``Music was his M-16''; band member Al Anderson suggests, ``He was a verbal newspaper'') and faithful to the island faith of Rastafarianism.
Besides some 400 Catholic inmates, there are 300 to 400 Protestant women, 50 Muslims, 18 Jews, 11 Chinese Buddhists and a few adherents of Hinduism, Rastafarianism and Native American spirituality.
Scholarly incursions into West Indian religion and theology tend to be fixated on Rastafarianism or liberation theology.