Rastafarian

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Rastafarian

(răs-tă-fă′rē-ăn)
A religious cult that originated in Jamaica in the 1930s and has members in the Caribbean, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. It is of medical importance because cult members' dietary practices may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency with subsequent neurological disease, megaloblastic anemia, or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impossibility of cooperation between these two locals of the EWF was to have a great impact on the Rastafari movement in its push towards the foundation of the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
The consequences of the separation of the EWF and the Twelve Tribes of Israel are still visible today in the settlement in Shashemene, especially in terms of legitimacy, power, and sociability and, more broadly, in the international diffusion of the Rastafari movement.
Rastafari in Jamaica and all over the world claimed the right to be 'earth citizens', and a core principle of the Rastafari movement was that Rastas had the right and freedom to exist.
Since its humble beginning in the slums of West Kingston, the Rastafari movement has managed to transmit its message throughout the world.
In the famous Report on the Rastafari Movement in Kingston, Jamaica, published in 1960, Howell was presented to the public mainly as a criminal, and as someone who was quite likely insane (Smith, Augier & Nettleford 1960:6, 8, 9).
Yet paradoxically, the tremendous prejudice against Rastafari movement that was initially fuelled by western scholarship was maintained in some African States including apartheid-ruled South Africa and Zimbabwe (Campbell 1988:81).
The book begins by exploring the diffusion of the hip-hop movement in Jamaica and the Rastafari movement in the United States, facilitated by medias and the music industry.
Smith and Roy Augier) of a groundbreaking study of the Rastafari movement in 1961.
This is further actualizing the notion of "each one teach one," prevalent with the Rastafari movement as it relates to the almost insidious method of proselytizing the faith.
2010 will mark 50 years since the "Report on The Rastafari Movement in Kingston, Jamaica" was first published by the then University College of the West Indies.
How could you explain the increase of the Rastafari movement in the 1960s?
Simboonath Singh, "Resistance, Essentialism, and Empowerment in Black Nationalist Discourse in the African Diaspora: A Comparison of the Back to Africa, Black Power, and Rastafari Movements," Journal of African American Studies 8, no.