Raphanus


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Related to Raphanus: Raphanus raphanistrum, Raphanus sativus longipinnatus

Raphanus

a plant genus in the family Brassicaceae; contains the poisonous principle S-methylcysteine sulfoxide and causes poisoning characterized by hemoglobinuria, jaundice, diarrhea and liver damage.

Raphanus raphanistrum
called also jointed charlock, wild radish.
Raphanus sativus
may contain toxic amounts of nitrate. The culinary radish.
References in periodicals archive ?
English: Chinese water spinach, Water convolvulus, Water spinach, Swamp cabbage, Swamp morning glory, Tropical spinach 12 Raphanus sativus L.
1985, "Vacuolar localization of enzymatic synthesis of cinnamoylamalates in protoplasts from Raphanus sativus leaves," Physiol.
Evers (1968) listed this species (as Hyadaphis pseudobrassicae Davis) on Brassica oleracea and Raphanus sativus.
The formation of tryphine coating the pollen grains of Raphanus and its properties relating to the self incompatibility system.
Phenols and antioxidative status of Raphanus sativus grown in copper excess.
Na regiao de Jaboticabal, Estado de Sao Paulo, nas condicoes e na epoca em que foi realizado o ensaio, a cultura do feijao pode conviver com as plantas daninhas; Acanthospermum hispidum, Arachis hypogaea, Cenchrus echinatus, Portulaca oleracea e Raphanus raphanistrum por ate 27, 23, 19 e 13 dias apos emergencia das plantas de feijao, nas densidades de semeadura de dez, 15, dez e 15 plantas [m.
capitata, Chinese cabbage, Coleus blumei, Cucumis sativus, Hibiscus esculentus, Pisum sativum, Raphanus sativus, and Lycopersicon esculentum exposed to 14 fg Hg vapor/l, radicle emergence was not substantially reduced, but in Mentha sylvestris and Lactuca saliva it was reduced by 50%.
Occasional, tricotyledonous embryos also occur in Acer, Brassica, Juglans, Pittosporum, Raphanus, and Sesamum (Palser, 1975; Gupta & Jain, 1980; Dube et al.
Among several varieties of Raphanus sativus he noted that a lamina c.
Rothberg and Cunningham (1978) reported similar results with freeze-fractured root hairs of Raphanus sativus.