Ranke


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Related to Ranke: Leopold von Ranke

Ran·ke

(rahn'kĕ),
Johannes, German anthropologist and physician, 1836-1916. See: Ranke angle.

Ran·ke

(rahn'kĕ),
Karl E. von, German chemist, 1870-1926. See: Ranke complex, Ranke formula.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leopold von Rankes vooronderstelling om alleen "naakte waarheid zonder opsmuk" (Lorenz 1998: 250) te produceren, wordt door Emants (bewust/onbewust) bekritiseerd, zelfs belachelijk gemaakt, doordat hij de autofictieve novelle van Termeer een "onopgesmukte openbaring" noemt (Emants 1894: 75).
To trace history's lineage, to successfully explain, in clear terms, the convolutions, projects, impediments, and contexts of thinkers and schools of thought to whom we owe so much--among them Ranke, Nietsche, Marx, Derrida, Hayden White, E.
See Leopold yon Ranke, The Secret of World History: Selected Writings on the Art and Science of History, ed.
complained of jurors being of "meane ranke," Beattie points out that in London this was aimed at the "minor civil courts" not criminal trials (p.
Nagel BHP, Mortier W, Elmlinger M, Wollman HA, Schmitt K, Ranke MB.
Cynthia Ranke, an intern in 1999-2000, insists, "There is life after the intern year.
Accordingly, the footing for Troeltsch's attack on Hegel lies in an understanding of historical methodology to which Ranke devoted most of his theoretical speculation.
8) Heine saw Scott's work as bound up with the German romance tradition and as relating to Cervantes, while Goethe thought that "All is great" in his fiction, and Ranke claimed that Scott had made him a historian (Hayden 305, 308).
Leopold von Ranke sostiene, infatti, agli inizi del XIX secolo, che l'esposizione storica si coniuga con l'espressione letteraria.
The book begins in the Berlin of the brilliant nineteenth century historian Leopold von Ranke, who is credited with the invention of documented history in its modern form.
Ranke (cited by Rivers 1901), having learnt from the indigenous peoples in South America how to identify the gait of a deer, could do just as well at identifying the sex of a deer even though he was myopic.
Instead they embraced the distinction that historians of the von Ranke ('show it as it really was') school drew between facts, which were treated as constituting the basis and ever-expanding core of archaeology, and interpretations, which were regarded as provisional personal opinions.