Cajal

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Ca·jal

(Ramón y Cajal) (kah-hahl', rah-mōn' ē ka-hal'),
Santiago, Spanish histologist and 1906 Nobel laureate, 1852-1934. See: Cajal cell, horizontal cell of Cajal, Cajal astrocyte stain, interstitial nucleus of Cajal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morosini, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, MicrobiologyCarretera de Colmenar Km 9, 28034-Madrid, Spain; email: mmorosini.
Impresiones de un arterioesclerotico--, sino tambien en la obra Cuando era nino: La infancia de Ramon y Cajal contada por el mismo, con la que intenta insuflar en la poblacion infantil su concepto, tan entusiasta como severo, de patriotismo.
Address for correspondence: Rogelio LopezVelez, Tropical Medicine and Clinical Parasitology, Infectious Diseases Department, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Carretera de Colmenar Km 9,1, Madrid 28034, Spain; email: rlopezvelez.
The original firm of Ramon & Cajal was founded in 1985 by Pedro Ramon y Cajal Agueras.
Dr Turrientes is a senior scientist in the microbiology department of the Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal in Madrid.
The group is working with a number of institutions including the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada; the US Military HIV Research Program; ICONA; the Italian ARCA database, co-ordinated by the University of Siena; the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain; Fundacio irsiCaixa, Badelona, Spain; Northwestern University Division of Infectious Diseases, Chicago, USA; National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Sydney, Australia; Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain; The Italian MASTER cohort, University of Brescia, Italy, The Community Program for Clinical Research in AIDS (CPCRA) and others.
One hundred years ago, the Spanish neuroscientist Santiago Ramon y Cajal postulated that diffusible chemical attractants weave neural networks by sending signals to the developing brain.
DeFeudis served as a Professor of Physiology, Universidad Autonoma, Facultad de Medicina, Madrid, Spain and Head of the Neurochemisrtry Service, Centro Ramon y Cajal, Madrid Spain.
Chronic Chagas disease was diagnosed in 120 patients during 2003-2008 at the Tropical Medicine Unit, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, in Madrid, Spain.
Paino of the Hospital Ramon y Cajal in Madrid grew thin layers of Schwann cells in culture dishes coated with collagen, a connective tissue.
In 1906, Santiago Ramon y Cajal achieved the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for his work on the structure of the nervous system.