food irradiation

(redirected from Radurization)
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The use of low levels—e.g., < 1 mrad—of ionizing radiation to retard spoilage, so named as it has the same effect as pasteurisation—i.e., it improves shelf life and inactivates bacteria that cause food spoilage

food irradiation

The preservation of foods with ionizing radiation. Radiation extends the shelf life of foods by decreasing the number of germs and insects present in them. The process is expensive and has met with considerable resistance from consumers.
See also: irradiation

food irradiation

Deliberate exposure of food to strong ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays, to kill bacteria and insect pests and delay natural changes. Irradiation does not eliminate bacterial poisons (toxins) already formed or kill viruses, but irradiation of food tightly sealed in a suitable container, such as a polythene bag, will kill contained bacteria and further contamination does not occur. Food irradiation by gamma rays does not induce radioactivity; the effects are chemical only and may include changes in flavour and some loss of vitamins.