radionuclide

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radionuclide

 [ra″de-o-noo´klīd]
a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd),
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity.

radionuclide

/ra·dio·nu·clide/ (-noo´klīd) a nuclide that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

radionuclide

[-no̅o̅′klīd]
Etymology: L, radiare + nucleus, nut kernel
an isotope that undergoes radioactive decay. Any element with an excess of either neutrons or protons in the nucleus is unstable and tends toward radioactive decay, with the emission of energy that may be measurable with a detector. The processes of radioactive decay include beta particle emission, electron capture, isomeric transition, and positron emission. Positron-emitting radionuclides are important in positron emission tomography and in medical research. Radionuclides used in scintigraphy include 123I, 131I, 111In, 75Se, 99mTc, and 201Tl. Radionuclides of cobalt, iodine, phosphorus, strontium, and other elements are used for treatment of tumors and cancers and for nuclear imaging of internal parts of the body. See also nuclear scanning.

radionuclide

Radioactive isotope, radioisotope Radiation physics A nuclide with an unstable neutron to proton ratio, which undergoes radioactive decay; an artificial or natural nuclide with an unstable nucleus, that decays spontaneously, emitting electrons–β-particles or protons–α-particles and γ-radiation, ultimately achieving nuclear stability; RNs are used as in vivo or in vitro labels, for RT, or as sources of energy

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

Radionuclide

A chemical substance, called an isotope, that exhibits radioactivity. A gamma camera, used in nuclear medicine procedures, will pick up the radioactive signals as the substance gathers in an organ or tissue. They are sometimes referred to as tracers.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

radionuclide (rā´dēōnoo´klīd),

n an unstable or radioactive type of atom characterized by the constitution of its nucleus and capable of existing for a measurable time. The nuclear constitution is specified by the number of protons
(A), number of neutrons
(N), and energy content, or alternatively by the atomic number
(Z), mass number
(A − N + Z), and atomic mass.

radionuclide

a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations. Used in diagnosis for whole body or individual organ scanning. See also radioactive isotope, nuclide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment modelling tools, like MODARIA contribute to strengthening global efforts to control public exposure to radionuclides, which are or have been released into the environment, said Peter Johnston, Director of the IAEA Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety.
The ITM Group announced today that its subsidiary ITG GmbH has successfully in-licensed DOTA-Zoledronate, a next generation theranostic agent for Bone Targeted Radionuclide Therapy and Diagnostics in patients suffering from bone metastases.
CAP88-PC version 4 is approved by the EPA to demonstrate compliance with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) that apply to radionuclides, but EPA says numerous changes and improvements have been added to the model under Version 4.
With photos) VIENNA, Sept 17 (KUNA) -- The State of Kuwait hammered out Tuesday an agreement with the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) to operate Kuwait's Radionuclide Station RN40.
At least 7 bone-seeking radionuclides have shown evidence of both safety and efficacy in reducing pain from diffuse skeletal metastases.
Radionuclide behaviour in the natural environment; science, implications and lessons for the nuclear industry.
Although radionuclides are widespread, there are large gaps in our knowledge about sources of these materials, their distribution, associated health risks, and mitigation measures.
Exposure to radionuclides, such as iodine-131 and cesium-137, increases the incidence of cancer.
The point is that when a medical laboratory gets a call for imaging with radionuclides that have half-lives in the seconds or minutes, they can reach for a parent material with long shelf life that they can modify, rather than having to cook up a new batch from scratch with a nuclear reactor in the basement.