radionuclide

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radionuclide

 [ra″de-o-noo´klīd]
a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd),
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity.

radionuclide

/ra·dio·nu·clide/ (-noo´klīd) a nuclide that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

radionuclide

[-no̅o̅′klīd]
Etymology: L, radiare + nucleus, nut kernel
an isotope that undergoes radioactive decay. Any element with an excess of either neutrons or protons in the nucleus is unstable and tends toward radioactive decay, with the emission of energy that may be measurable with a detector. The processes of radioactive decay include beta particle emission, electron capture, isomeric transition, and positron emission. Positron-emitting radionuclides are important in positron emission tomography and in medical research. Radionuclides used in scintigraphy include 123I, 131I, 111In, 75Se, 99mTc, and 201Tl. Radionuclides of cobalt, iodine, phosphorus, strontium, and other elements are used for treatment of tumors and cancers and for nuclear imaging of internal parts of the body. See also nuclear scanning.

radionuclide

Radioactive isotope, radioisotope Radiation physics A nuclide with an unstable neutron to proton ratio, which undergoes radioactive decay; an artificial or natural nuclide with an unstable nucleus, that decays spontaneously, emitting electrons–β-particles or protons–α-particles and γ-radiation, ultimately achieving nuclear stability; RNs are used as in vivo or in vitro labels, for RT, or as sources of energy

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

Radionuclide

A chemical substance, called an isotope, that exhibits radioactivity. A gamma camera, used in nuclear medicine procedures, will pick up the radioactive signals as the substance gathers in an organ or tissue. They are sometimes referred to as tracers.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

radionuclide (rā´dēōnoo´klīd),

n an unstable or radioactive type of atom characterized by the constitution of its nucleus and capable of existing for a measurable time. The nuclear constitution is specified by the number of protons
(A), number of neutrons
(N), and energy content, or alternatively by the atomic number
(Z), mass number
(A − N + Z), and atomic mass.

radionuclide

a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations. Used in diagnosis for whole body or individual organ scanning. See also radioactive isotope, nuclide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mots cles: Arctique, facteurs de concentration, biote, modeles dynamiques, radionucleides, biomobilisation
Population dose from natural radionucleides in phosphate fertilizers.
Also, he adds that DOE assessments show that any radionucleides would represent a very small portion of the overall background exposure levels for radiation.
The EPA study would take up to five years to conduct, and would analyze soils for a list of radionucleides.
SRMs from other NIST laboratories and measurement areas cover a variety of applications that include sinusoidal roughness of steel blocks; magnification level for scanning electron microscopes; resistivity of silicon wafers; transmittance of optical density filters; characterization of radionucleides in ocean sediment, Rockwell C Scale for hardness; fracture toughness of ceramics; wavelength reference for a hydrogen cyanide absorption cell; and thermal resistance of fibrous glass insulation.
On a determine les niveaux de radionucleides dans les muscles et les os ainsi que la ou les causes de mortalite afin de repondre aux questions que se posaient les residents de la region.
La derive des debris du transport glaciel pourrait constituer un important mecanisme de transport, depuis la plate-forme continentale jusqu'a la fosse marine, pour des radionucleides provenant d'activites connexes au cycle du combustible nucleaire, radionucleides qui sont elimines vers les zones cotieres arctiques de l'ancienne Union Sovietique.