radioisotope

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radioisotope

 [ra″de-o-i´so-tōp]
a radioactive form of an element, consisting of atoms with unstable nuclei, which undergo radioactive decay to stable forms, emitting characteristic alpha, beta, or gamma radiation. These may occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. Scientists create artificial radioisotopes by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be “labeled” or “tagged.” See also radiation therapy.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sō-tōp),
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

/ra·dio·iso·tope/ (-i´so-tōp) a radioactive isotope; one having an unstable nucleus and emitting characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form.

radioisotope

[rā′dē·ō·ī′sətōp]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, isos, equal, topos, place
a radioactive form of an element, which may be used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

see ISOTOPE.

Radioisotope

A chemical tagged with radioactive compounds that is injected during a nuclear medicine procedure to highlight organ or tissue.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope (rā´dēōī´sōtōp),

n a chemical element that has been made radioactive through bombardment of neutrons in a cyclotron or atomic pile or found in a natural state.

radioisotope

a radioactive form of an element. A radioisotope consists of unstable atoms that undergo radioactive decay emitting alpha, beta or gamma radiation. Radioisotopes occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. See also radionuclide.
Artificial radioisotopes are created by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be 'labeled' or 'tagged'.

radioisotope organ scanning
injection of an isotope and scanning of organs in which the isotope is planned to locate, e.g. radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
The health ministry said existing stocks of the radioisotopes at state hospitals will be depleted by Friday -- the same day on which deliveries will resume.
Radioactive elements, called radioisotopes or radionuclides, are unstable.
Total time of count was 2 minutes and total radioisotope was 500 Kcount.
In the study, high specific uptake was obtained in human colon cancer cells transplanted in mice, resulting in very high tumour-to-blood and tumour-to-kidney ratios of radioisotope uptake.
Radioactive tracers have many advantages over other tracers, which include the identity of chemical and physical properties of all isotopes of a given element, the emission of radiation is a specific property of the tracer which is not affected by interference from other materials in the system, radioisotopes are measurable with high sensitivity and therefore detectable in very low concentration and the measurement in situ is possible.
B25/B35 for SPECT and Generator Radioisotopes - The B25 and B35 Cyclotrons are designed for the production of single photon emitting radioisotopes used in SPECT such as Iodine-123, and Thallium-201.
7 million to NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes to further develop its accelerator-based Mo-99 production technology, bringing the total NNSA support to this project to $5.
Apart from diagnostics, the ITM Group is also boosting the development of therapeutic radioisotope treatments.
How much radioactivity gets into marine life depends on a host of factors: How long the organisms are exposed to radioactivity is certainly important, but so too are the sizes and species of the organisms, the radioisotopes involved, the temperature and salinity of the water, how much oxygen is in it, and many other factors such as the life stage of the organisms.
Researchers at the Royal Brompton hospital in London said a 55-year-old pilot who had a heart scan using radioisotope thallium triggered detectors at Moscow and was interrogated.
With an X-ray tube, there are no NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licenses required, the Department of Transportation has no special requirements for shipment or transport of these X-ray tube-based units, there is no wipe test and no costly replacement and disposal of depleted radioisotopes," Mark Lessard, business development manager for Oxford Instruments, Boston, says.
physicians employ radioisotopes in an estimated 13 million nuclear-medicine procedures and another 100 million laboratory tests.