radioactive contamination

(redirected from Radioactive exposure)

radioactive contamination

the undesirable addition of radioactive material to the body or part of the environment, such as clothing or equipment. Contamination of the body by beta radiation may occur through the ingestion, inhalation, or absorption of a beta emitter. Instruments, drapes, surgical gloves, and clothing that come in contact with serous fluids, blood, and urine of patients containing beta or gamma radiation emitters may be contaminated. The severity of the contamination is directly related to the elapsed time between the administration of the radioactive isotope and surgery. On completion of the procedure, possibly contaminated material is isolated and checked. If found to be contaminated, it is disposed of according to institutional and federal standards for the disposal of radioactive waste.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magseed is an excellent technique, offering a valid alternative solution for patients, without the safety and regulatory concerns associated with radioactive exposure or complications associated with traditional wire systems," said Dr.
natural gas drilling boom have brought heightened scrutiny to the issues of radioactive exposure and waste management.
Some experts have questioned whether Arafat could have died of polonium poisoning, pointing to a brief recovery during his illness that they said was not consistent with radioactive exposure.
John Goffman, and others were later hired by industry and government to study the possible effects of radioactive exposure to humans.
The radioactive exposure of researchers and other staff members was "very regrettable," he said.
The winds limited radioactive exposure on land, as more than 80 percent of the fallout fell on the sea.
The report 'seems to suggest a certain safety while omitting the important information that the risk of developing cancer and other radiation-induced diseases increases proportionally to the amount of radioactive exposure,' Rosen, a pediatrician, said.
Authorities were preparing to distribute iodine to protect people from radioactive exposure.
Iodine can be used to help protect the body from radioactive exposure.
Workers in protective clothing were scanning people arriving at evacuation centres for radioactive exposure.
More than 200,000 citizens died in two atomic bombings in the Japanese cities and many people still suffer aftereffects of radioactive exposure even today 60 years later, Hatoyama said.