Radio waves


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Related to Radio waves: microwaves, electromagnetic spectrum

Radio waves

Electromagnetic energy of the frequency range corresponding to that used in radio communications, usually 10,000 cycles per second to 300 billion cycles per second. Radio waves are the same as visible light, x rays, and all other types of electromagnetic radiation, but are of a higher frequency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies like this prove the potential risk of radio waves in rats, but don't necessarily transfer to humans.
The Radio Wave Building's roots are in technological innovation and the eighth floor office has been fully modernized with state of the art features," said Weitzman.
Immediate resolution of on-site radio wave issues through simulation and visualization
By comparison with conventional proving trials, the Two-Stage Method makes it possible to generate radio wave environment characteristics as desired, and represents a useful evaluation tool displaying good reproducibility.
Parents may not be worried about their health, but they will likely think twice when it comes to the radio waves their children get exposed to during the school day.
The conference comes in a bid to ensure that radio waves that transmit the media message are free of any undesired interference.
They had nothing to do with the radio wave bursts, but just happen to be located in the same direction," explains astrophysicist Giorgos Leloudas, Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen and Weizmann Institute, Israel.
It was very interesting to compare atmosphere phenomena distributions separately in the coastal and continental terrains because radio waves propagation is different in these locations.
The bid value for spectrum-- 900 MHz and 1,800 MHz bands-- has now reached over 90 per cent of the money that government received in the 3G spectrum auction in 2010 although a larger quantum of radio waves has been put on the block in the current round.
Using radio waves, researchers there have created an antennae system called WiTrack that can map the movements of a human in the next room.
Scientists have demonstrated a way to mold radio waves into spirals that could allow multiple radio stations to broadcast at the same frequency.
Since signal stations could be in any direction from the person using a mobile (the device is designed to transmit radio waves in all directions to catch the signal, including a proportion towards the user's body), radio waves leak onto the phone cell can occur.