radiative efficiency

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radiative efficiency

A measure of the net energy change in the atmosphere caused by climatic factors. Radiative efficiency can be used to assess and compare anthropogenic and natural drivers of climate change.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change defines radiative forcing as
We computed the 1961-1990 baseline temperatures from the 20C3M scenario simulations of the individual models, which were driven by observed 20th-century radiative forcing (GHG concentrations and volcanoes).
Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Climate Sensitivity Deduced from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene Transition.
Climate System models that use all human plus natural radiative forcing are able to reproduce the observed increase in temperature with remarkable integrity.
The degree of net methane emissions (after reductions for capture) from wood and paper can determine if HWP Contribution associated with additions to landfills increases or reduces radiative forcing in C[O.
The ranges of uncertainty of several natural drivers of climate variability, such as clouds and water vapor, are larger than the increase in radiative forcing caused by a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide.
So bear with us, if you will, as we discuss concentration caps, radiative forcing, climate sensitivity, and increased climatic variability.
National Research Council, Panel on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Climate Change (1996), A Plan for a Research Program on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Climate Change, Washington, D.
A positive radiative forcing, such as produced by greenhouse gases, leads to a warming of the (Earth's) surface," according to the draft of the Third Assessment Report, prepared by a working group of the IPCC.
One of the study's conclusions is that "a shift to compressed natural gas vehicles from gasoline or diesel vehicles leads to greater radiative forcing of the climate for 80 or 280 yr, respectively, before beginning to produce benefits.
In particular, light absorption by aerosol particles such as mineral dust and black carbon (BC; thought to be the second strongest contribution to current global warming after CO2) is of fundamental importance from a climate perspective because the presence of absorbing particles (1) contributes to solar radiative forcing, (2) heats absorbing aerosol layers, (3) can evaporate clouds and (4) change atmospheric dynamics.
The WMO's annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin shows that between 1990 and 2012 there was a 32 percent increase in radiative forcing -- the warming effect on our climate -- because of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other heat-trapping long-lived gases such as methane and nitrous oxide.