radioactive contamination

(redirected from Radiation release)

radioactive contamination

the undesirable addition of radioactive material to the body or part of the environment, such as clothing or equipment. Contamination of the body by beta radiation may occur through the ingestion, inhalation, or absorption of a beta emitter. Instruments, drapes, surgical gloves, and clothing that come in contact with serous fluids, blood, and urine of patients containing beta or gamma radiation emitters may be contaminated. The severity of the contamination is directly related to the elapsed time between the administration of the radioactive isotope and surgery. On completion of the procedure, possibly contaminated material is isolated and checked. If found to be contaminated, it is disposed of according to institutional and federal standards for the disposal of radioactive waste.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of radiation release ("Risk to Environmental Health"), triggered by earthquake and tsunami ("Disaster Trigger Event"), caused the release of the radiation ("Man-Made Hazard"), which was precipitated by site blackout and subsequent loss of cooling system capacity ("Vulnerability Factors").
Its radiation release was less significant than that of Chernobyl but the impact is still under study.
An investigation of a radiation release nine days later that contaminated 17 workers is expected in a few weeks.
This quantity is comparable to the radiation release from about 500 atomic bombs of the type dispatched onto Hiroshima in 1945.
Our own plants, we hope, are less immediately vulnerable, but unforeseen combinations of natural disasters, human incompetence, and even terrorist attacks make radiation release all too real a possibility on our own soil.
The severity of the Fukushima accident has been compared to the devastating 1986 Chernoby1 meltedown(the world's worst nuclear accident) in which thousands suffered from the radiation release.
When you add the radiation release from the damaged nuclear reactors, this sequence surely must fall into the low-probability, unthinkable category .
MOX, made from plutonium that is capable of being used in nuclear weapons, is harder to control during reactor operation and results in a more serious radiation release in the event of an accident.
Summary: Japan admits that burying a crippled nuclear plant in sand and concrete may be the only way to prevent a catastrophic radiation release.
There are dangers for radiation release that could affect the immediate vicinity of nuclear plants and potentially could drift over other parts of Japan, he said.
Scientists say these kinds of anomalies simply aren't explained by official radiation release estimates.
Ukraine has previously said it had already registered 4,400 deaths related to the accident, and early speculation following the radiation release predicted tens of thousands would die.

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