racism

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racism

A conscious or unconscious belief in the superiority of a particular race, which may lead to acts of discrimination and unequal treatment based on an individual’s skin colour or ethnic origin or identity.

ra·cism

(rā'sizm)
Attitudes, practices and other factors that discriminate against people because of their race, color, or ethnicity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Guilty By Color" is successful as both a courtroom procedural drama and a penetrating look at how simmering racial prejudice can lead to the worst sorts of injustice.
Eliana La Ferrara, Bocconi University, "Does Interaction Affect Racial Prejudice and Cooperation?
Does merely professing Christian beliefs rid one of racial prejudice and the motivation to discriminate against others who may be racially or ethnically distinct?
Abu Hamza, who has already served jail terms in Britain where he lives, is a notorious figure pursued several times for inciting hatred and racial prejudice from his London-based Mosque at Finsbury Park.
APARTHEID | SOUTH AFRICA | RACIAL PREJUDICE | BALLET
Set amongst the simmering racial tensions of Los Angeles, several intertwining stories expose the racial prejudice that engulfs the city.
Soon we find that all ethnic minorities are equal, but some are more equal than others, and as such need more of a reward for their efforts and any criticism is not only counterrevolutionary, but must be viewed through the lens of political correctness so that these ethnic minorities who are playing the race card against the wider community, can accuse the wider community of racial prejudice.
The mother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence has accused the Government of still not doing enough to tackle racial prejudice in society.
The study also found that 45% of people believed there was more racial prejudice today than five years ago.
The first American group of black military pilots and crew dealt with racial prejudice along with the pressures of war.
It seems unlikely that a third of white people have been the victims of direct racial prejudice.
Asked by a Washington Post-ABC News poll if they had at least some feelings of racial prejudice, 30 per cent of white respondents and 34 per cent of African-Americans polled answered "yes.