quinoline

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quinoline

 [kwin´o-lēn]
an amine or alkaloid derivable from quinine, coal tar, and various other sources, which has antiseptic, antipyretic, and antimalarial properties.

quin·o·line

(kwin'ō-lēn, -lin),
1. A volatile nitrogenous base obtained by the distillation of coal tar, bones, alkaloids, and other substances; a basic structure of many dyes and drugs; also used as an antimalarial. Synonym(s): chinoleine, leucoline
2. One of a class of alkaloids based on the quinoline (1) structure.

quinoline

(kwĭn′ə-lēn′, -lĭn)
n.
An aromatic organic base, C9H7N, having a pungent tarlike odor, synthesized or obtained from coal tar, and used as a food preservative and in making antiseptics, drugs, and dyes.

quinoline

[kwin′o-lēn]
an amine or alkaloid; with antiseptic, antipyretic, and antimalarial properties, derivable from quinine, coal tar, and various other sources.

quinoline

a drug used originally as an antimalarial. Some of its derivatives are used as antiprotozoal and topical antifungal agents, e.g. quinuronium sulfate, 4-aminoquinoline, di-iodohydroxyquinoline and clioquinol (iodochlorhydroxyquin).
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, in vitro drug pressure only with artemisinin selects for enhanced survival rates to endoperoxides, quinolines, and an antifolate.
2, the main nitrogen compounds in the feedstock are nitriles, anilines, pyridines, quinolines, acridines, indoles and carbazoles.
Enone 1 reacts under Michael conditions with malononitrile to give the quinoline derivative (11).
Halogenated quinolines were reported as a possible cause of subacute myelooptic neuropathy (SMON), an uncommon neurological syndrome that occurred primarily in Japan.
While quinolines and other anti-malarial drugs halt this process, the parasites have the ability to selectively reject them from their digestive sacs.
These simple natural quinoline derivatives 2-n-propylquinoline, chimanine B, chimanine D, 2-n-pentylquinoline, 4-methoxy-2-phenylquinoline, and 2-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-quinoline were tested against strains of parasites causing cutaneous leishmaniasis and exhibited therapeutic activity (Fournet 1996).
This suggests that there may be different structural forms of these quinolines, with different binding affinities, says Padmanabhan Nair, a chemist with the Agriculture Department's Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Md.
However, when heating rate increases, the relative abundance of pyridines (DBE = 4) and quinolines (DBE = 7) undergoes a relative obvious decrease within the carbon number range of 21-37, while there is only a small change in their relative abundance within the carbon number ranges of both 12-21 and 37-48.
Substituted diphenylamines, diphenylamine reaction products, quinolines and p-phenylenediamines are the four sub classes of amine antioxidants containing the greatest number of commercial products.
2006) developed a BINOL-derived chiral phosphoric acid catalyst for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 2-substituted and 3-substituted quinolines with up to 99% ee and 86% ee, respectively.
1996, In vivo efficacy of oral and intralesional administration of 2-substituted quinolines in experimental treatment of new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania amazonensis.