quinoline

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quinoline

 [kwin´o-lēn]
an amine or alkaloid derivable from quinine, coal tar, and various other sources, which has antiseptic, antipyretic, and antimalarial properties.

quin·o·line

(kwin'ō-lēn, -lin),
1. A volatile nitrogenous base obtained by the distillation of coal tar, bones, alkaloids, and other substances; a basic structure of many dyes and drugs; also used as an antimalarial. Synonym(s): chinoleine, leucoline
2. One of a class of alkaloids based on the quinoline (1) structure.

quinoline

(kwĭn′ə-lēn′, -lĭn)
n.
An aromatic organic base, C9H7N, having a pungent tarlike odor, synthesized or obtained from coal tar, and used as a food preservative and in making antiseptics, drugs, and dyes.

quinoline

[kwin′o-lēn]
an amine or alkaloid; with antiseptic, antipyretic, and antimalarial properties, derivable from quinine, coal tar, and various other sources.

quinoline

a drug used originally as an antimalarial. Some of its derivatives are used as antiprotozoal and topical antifungal agents, e.g. quinuronium sulfate, 4-aminoquinoline, di-iodohydroxyquinoline and clioquinol (iodochlorhydroxyquin).
References in periodicals archive ?
However, high survival rates were observed after exposure to 4 endoperoxides, as well as increased survival rates to lethal doses of pyrimethamine and quinolines (amodiaquine, mefloquine, chloroquine, and quinine).
nitriles > anilines > pyridines > quinolines > acridines > indoles > carbazoles
Reaction of 1 with ethyl cyanoacetate in the presence of catalytic amount of piperidine furnished the chromene derivative (12), while its reaction with ethyl cyanoacetate in the presence of ammonium acetate gave the quinoline derivative (13).
This is proposed to occur by a two-step process whereby the quinoline binds first to heme, and the resulting heme-drug complex binds to and saturates the heme-polymer chains.
Quinoline derivatives have been earlier used for a long time in the treatment of human amoebic dysentery and bacillary dysenteries (de Alencar and Sampaio, 1963; Heseltine and Campbell, 1960; Heseltine and Freeman, 1959).
While quinolines and other anti-malarial drugs halt this process, the parasites have the ability to selectively reject them from their digestive sacs.
Expeditious preparation of 2-substituted quinolines.
These simple natural quinoline derivatives 2-n-propylquinoline, chimanine B, chimanine D, 2-n-pentylquinoline, 4-methoxy-2-phenylquinoline, and 2-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-quinoline were tested against strains of parasites causing cutaneous leishmaniasis and exhibited therapeutic activity (Fournet 1996).
Compounds E and F both contained polymerized quinolines, F containing the material having the higher molecular weight.
This suggests that there may be different structural forms of these quinolines, with different binding affinities, says Padmanabhan Nair, a chemist with the Agriculture Department's Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Md.
Again, some polycyclic aromatic nitrogen hydrocarbons (PANH) present in the aromatic fraction of shale oil, such as quinolines and methylquinolines, are extremely harmful to human health due to their toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity [15, 16].
Vargas-Mendez LY, Kouznetsov VV , Leal SM, Mora U, Coronado CA, Melendez CM, Romero Bohorquez AR, Rivero, P (2007) Target-oriented synthesis of antiparasitic 2-hetaryl substituted quinolines based on imino Diels-Alder reactions.