quick

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Quick

(kwik),
Armand J., U.S. physician, 1894-1978. See: Quick method, Quick test.

quick

(kwik),
1. Pregnant with a child whose fetal movements are recognizable.
2. A sensitive part, painful to touch.
[A.S. cwic, living]

quick

(kwĭk)
n.
Sensitive or raw exposed flesh, as under the fingernails.
adj.
1. Pregnant.
2. Alive.

quick

A term of waning use for a state in which a pregnant woman can feel foetal movement.

quick

(kwik)
1. Pregnant with a child whose fetal movements are recognizable.
2. A sensitive part, painful to touch.
[A.S. cwic, living]

quick

(kwik)
A sensitive part, painful to touch.
[A.S. cwic, living]

Patient discussion about quick

Q. If the baby movement is quick, will it be harmful …..? Hi to all here…….I am 24 and 3 week pregnant. I am so happy because pregnancy is vital in every women’s life. I am curious to know when I could feel the baby movement and how it will be. If the baby movement is quick, will it be harmful …..?

A. First, congratulations for Olivia..

You should feel your baby's first movements, called "quickening," between weeks 16 and 24 of your pregnancy. If this is your first pregnancy, you may not feel your baby move until closer to 24 weeks. By the second pregnancy, some women start to feel movements as early as 13 weeks (this varies in every pregnant moms).

So when you reach your second trimester later, you need to monitor your baby's movement sometimes (just like saloni explained to you). Feel free to consult with your OB-GYN doctor whenever you feel a problem with your pregnancy.

But I wish you all the best for your pregnancy. Good luck! Stay healthy always..

Q. What are some of the best foods to eat that are low in fat but offer quick energy before a workout? I find that I get tired in the middle of my workouts and have trouble completing my weight lifting sessions. I would love to know some tips for staying energized without using anything that would make me shaky.

A. SUGARFREE STUFF

More discussions about quick
References in periodicals archive ?
As Quicksand opens, Helga Crane sits beneath a "reading lamp" surrounded by "the bright covers of the books she had taken down from their long shelves.
Fittingly, then, Quicksand starts in a sense where Iola Leroy left off, and in a lands cape Larsen knew well from her own experiences at Fisk and Tuskegee: at "a large and flourishing school" in the South, where devoted servants of the race are found "casting [their] lot with the colored" and "lifting up the homes of the people" (280).
Larsen refigures this mise-en-abyme within Iola Leroy in a satiric scene in Quicksand, just after the narrator has reflected on the source of Helga's love of bright colors despite the Naxos preference for "black, brown, and grey":
Indeed, Dreiser's work, and particularly his most controversial novel, Sister Carrie, had by the time Larsen was writing Quicksand achieved unprecedented fame, catalyzed largely by the 1925 publication of An American Tragedy and its popular dramatic production on Broadway.
The Chicago section of Quicksand embeds as well an oblique but suggestive commentary on the contemporary politics of 1920s literary culture.
In the New York section of Quicksand that follows this scene, however, Larsen explores the tragic mulatto material not of "Negrophobia" propaganda but of a more self-consciously lite rary scene--material that was heavily informed by the convention but less explicitly racist, and perhaps, in Larsen's eyes, ultimately more insidious.
Melanctha" opens, as Quicksand ends, just after a scene of birth: The mulatta heroine has patiently assisted while "the sullen, childish, cowardly, black Rosie grumbled and fussed and howled and made herself to be an abomination and like a simple beast" (85).
19) But if "Melanctha" caught and held Larsen's interest, a book published even closer to her composition of Quicksand prompted an explicit desire to respond, along with the Harlem Renaissance writers Walter White and Jessie Fauset, in her own writing: T.
Birthright's tragic mulatto protagonist, Peter Siner, begins his journey through the novel on a Jim Crow car, returning from college in the North to his hometown in Tennessee to teach school, just as Larsen's heroine, inverting this journey near the beginning of Quicksand, leaves her teaching position in the South and rides a Jim Crow into the North.